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A novel HMW-GS of Dx5** with slightly faster migration rate than that of Dx5, was found in a Tibet bread wheat landrace using SDS-PAGE. Moreover, Dx5** is the subunit with the fastest migration rate in Glu-Dx locus. The gene for this subunit was isolated and its sequence was obtained in the present study. This gene was very similar to Dx5 both in nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequence. At the nucleotide sequence level, Dx5** different from Dx5 by the deletion of a 27 bp fragment and two nucleotide replacements at position 353(G/C) and 692(C/G), respectively. At the amino acid sequence level, Dx5** different from Dx5 by the deletion of a hexaploid (LGQGQQ) and a tripeptide (GQQ) repetitive motif and two amino acid replacements at position 118(C/S) and 231(A/G), respectively. These results suggested that the Dx5** was a derivation of Dx5 and was formed by replication slippage. Moreover, the specific cysteine (C) located at the beginning of the repetitive domain of Dx5, which proved to be critical for the end-use quality of wheat flours, was replaced by serine (S) in Dx5**.

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Aegilops tauschii is the generally accepted D genome diploid donor of hexaploid wheat. The significance of Ae. tauschii HMW-GS genes on bread-making properties of bread wheat has been well documented. Among them, Ae. tauschii HMW-GS Dx5 t +Dy12 t was thought as the pair with potentially value in endowing synthetic hexaploid wheat with good end-use qualities. In this paper, we isolated and sequenced genes Dx5 t and Dy12 t from Ae. tauschii accession As63. Amino acid sequence comparison indicated that Dy12 t from Ae. tauschii is more similar to Dy10 rather than Dy12 of bread wheat. The sequence of Dx5 t in Ae. tauschii accession As63 showed higher similarity to that of Dx5 in bread wheat than others. However, it is notable that Dx5 t lacked the additional cysteine residue in Dx5, which is responsible for good bread-making quality in common wheat. Moreover, compared to Dx5, Dx5 t has an extra hexpeptide repetitive motif unit (SGQGQQ) as well as five amino acid substitutions.

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Four amphiploid lines (SHW) based on T. monococcum (Tm) and T. boeoticum (Tb) were crossed to T. durum varieties to generate 13 combinations. Field germination and winter survival of hybrid plants in F2 were assessed. Among all crosses, those with SHW8A-Tb and SHW9A-Tm showed highest field germination but with different degrees of spike fragility. The variation on seed number and weight per main spike was studied in F4–6 from SHW8ATb/ Progres and SHW5A-Tb/Severina crosses after individual selection for these traits. Ten lines with durum phenotype from the former and three genotypes with dicoccum plant shape from the latter cross were developed. SDS-PAGE indicated the presence of HMW-GS 1Ax2*+1Aynull subunits in four lines, among which 1Ax2* was inherited from T. boeoticum acc.110 through SHW8A-Tb. Most of the selected genotypes possessed γ-gliadin45, which was relating to good end-use quality. Powdery mildew testing showed that all progenies resulted from the SHW8A-Tb/Progres were susceptible to 12 races of the pathogen, while three lines derived from the SHW5A-Tb/Severina cross behaved differently: G32 expressed resistance to six, G33 to 2, and G34 to 5 races. The selected genotypes from crosses involving SHW with T. boeoticum exhibited good breeding performance compared to tetraploid wheat parents, and might be of breeding interest to further research.

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Glutenin subunit alleles at the Glu-D3 locus and their effects on dough properties, pan bread, and dry white Chinese noodle (DWCN) qualities were investigated using 106 winter and facultative wheat cultivars and advanced lines. Allele Glu-D3c (42.5%) was the most frequent glutenin subunit, followed by Glu-D3b (25.5%) and Glu-D3a (23.6%). Glu-D3d and Glu-D3f occurred in only three and six cultivars, respectively. The effect of Glu-D3 was significant forDWCNquality, accounting for up to 16% of the variation, but there were no significant differences between individual Glu-D3 alleles on dough properties and qualities of DWCNand pan bread. Interaction effects Glu-A1 × Glu-D3 and Glu-B1 × Glu-D3 were significant for DWCN quality and loaf volume. More work is needed to understand the effects of Glu-D3 variation on the determination of dough properties and end-use quality.

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This study aimed to clarify the genetic mechanisms behind wheat flour color. Flour colorrelated traits (L*, a*, and b*) and polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity are important parameters that influence the end-use quality of wheat. Dissecting the genetic bases and exploring important chromosomal loci of these traits are extremely important for improving wheat quality. The diverse panel of 205 elite wheat varieties (lines) was genotyped using a highdensity Illumina iSelect 90K single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) assay to disclose the genetic mechanism of flour color-related traits and PPO activity. In 2 different environments and their mean values (MV), 28, 30, 24, and 12 marker-trait associations (MTAs) were identified for L*, a*, b* traits, and PPO activity, respectively. A single locus could explain from 5.52% to 20.01% of the phenotypic variation for all analyzed traits. Among them, 5 highly significant SNPs (P ≤ 0.0001), 11 stable SNPs (detected in all environments) and 25 multitrait MTAs were identified. Especially, BS00000020_51 showed pleiotropic effects on L*, a*, and b*, and was detected in all environments with the highest phenotypic contribution rates. Furthermore, this SNP was also found to be co-associated with wheat grain hardness, ash content, and pasting temperature of starch in previous studies. The identification of these significantly associated SNPs is helpful in revealing the genetic mechanisms of wheat colorrelated traits, and also provides a reference for follow-up molecular marker-assisted selection in wheat breeding.

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Cereal Research Communications
Authors: K. Tremmel-Bede, P. Mikó, M. Megyeri, G. Kovács, S. Howlett, B. Pearce, M. Wolfe, F. Löschenberger, B. Lorentz, L. Láng, Z. Bedő, and M. Rakszegi

Six cropping populations, three variety mixtures and one diversity population were developed from winter wheat varieties and studied for physical, compositional and end-use quality traits for three years (2011–2013) under different European climatic and management conditions in order to study the stability of these traits resulted by the genetic diversity. The beneficial compositional and nutritional properties of the populations were assessed, while variation and stability of the traits were analysed statistically. No significant differences were found among the populations in low-input and organic management farming systems in the physical, compositional and processing properties, but there was a difference in the stability of these traits. Most of the populations showed higher stability than the control wheat variety, and populations developed earlier had higher stability than those developed later. Furthermore, some populations were found to be especially unstable for some traits at certain sites (mostly at Austrian, Swiss and UK organic sites). Protein content of the populations was high (13.0–14.7%) without significant difference among them, but there was significant variation in their gluten content (28–36%) and arabinoxylan content (14.6–20.3 mg/g). The most outstanding population for both protein and arabinoxylan content was a Hungarian cropping population named ELIT-CCP. It was concluded that the diversity found in the mixtures and CCPs have stabilizing effect on the quality parameters, but a higher stability was observed under low-input than under organic conditions. These results could be beneficial not only for breeders but also for the consumers in the long run.

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, P.S. BAENZIGER, 1996: Genotype and environmental modification of wheat flour protein composition in relation to end-use quality. Crop Science 36, 296–300. Baenziger P.S. Genotype

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. (2001): Development of predictive models for end-use quality of spring wheats through canonical analysis. Int. J. Fd Sci. Technol. , 36 , 433–440. Shaheen M. Development of

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Cereal Research Communications
Authors: Sonja Maric, Tihomir Cupic, Goran Jukic, Ivan Varnica, and Dario Dunkovic

.A. — Eskridge K.M. — Nelson L.A.: 2005. Genetic improvement trends in agronomic performances and end-use quality characteristics among hard red winter wheat cultivars in Nebraska — Euphytica vol. 144 no. 1–2 187–198 pp

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.L., Partridge, S.J., Daqiq, L., Chong, P., Békés, F. 2002. Synergistic and additive effects of three high molecular weight glutenin subunit loci. II. Effects on wheat dough functionality and end-use quality. Cereal Chem. 79 :301

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