Search Results

You are looking at 11 - 20 of 21 items for :

  • "foreign capital" x
  • Business and Economics x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All

Stagnation rather than its Cause? Acta Oeconomica , 67 ( S ): 67 – 77 . 10.1556/032.2017.67.s.6 Prasad , E. S. – Rajan , R. G. – Subramanian , A. ( 2007 ): Foreign Capital and Economic Growth . NBER Working Paper , No. 13619 . PWT ( 2017

Open access

The article examines the significance of institutional quality for economic performance during transition. Institutions are the rules of the game. In any economy the most important institutions are the legal system, the state, the structure of the financial system and the system of international relations. The process of economic transition in Central and Eastern Europe was mainly a process of massive institutional changes which were spurred by economic causes and also themselves had significant economic consequences. The article examines the institutional changes in transition economies and shows that institutions matter. The first decade of transition gave the impression that it is important to build as good institutional framework as possible and as fast as possible. But today, with the quick growth of some South Eastern European economies, it seems not to hold that the better the institutions the better the economic performance, but rather to (at least) establish some satisfactory level of institutional quality is important to resume growth, which can also be assisted by foreign capital.

Restricted access

In this article, the authors give a rich-in-data account of Hungary's structural transition to a market economy between 1993 and 1998. Although the availability of statistics also puts constraint on which period to study, these years may as well be later termed the first phase of post-socialist transition. The article has three main parts. In the first, structural changes of the whole economy are presented; the structural shifts in output, value added, and investments are analysed. The diffusion of private ownership and foreign capital and the process of decentralisation and concentration are also discussed. In the second part, the manufacturing industries are in focus. With an interesting analytical tool – the growth matrix – the authors present a possible approach of studying sectoral development. By distinguishing the factor needs of the manufacturing industries, the factor intensities of production are also easy to understand and yet reasonable for studying the adjustment to modernisation trends. In the third part, the structural changes of foreign trade are shown: export orientation, import dependency, the relationship between export and technology are the main concerns of analysis. The impact of FDI on the manufacturing industries' foreign trade and performance close the third part of the article.

Restricted access

. Prasad, E. — Rogoff, K. — Wei, S. — Kose, M. (2003): Effects of Financial Globalization on Developing Countries . Occasional Paper No. 220, IMF. Rana, P. B. (1987): Foreign capital, savings and growth in the Asian region

Restricted access

. Baharumshah , A. Z. – Thanoon , M. A. ( 2006 ): Foreign Capital Flows and Economic Growth in East Asian Countries . China Economic Review 17 : 70 – 83 . Baharumshah , A. Z

Restricted access

Transformation Studies, No. 6. Diczházi, B. (1998): A külföldi tőke szerepe a privatizációban [The role of foreign capital in the privatisation]. Budapest: ÁPV Rt. A külföldi tőke

Restricted access

Foreign direct investment and external debt in Hungary

An attempt to examine the macroeconomic capital structure from a new perspective

Society and Economy
Authors: Iván Bélyácz and Mónika Kuti

Pitti, Zoltán (2001): A külföldi tőke szerepe a hazai gazdaság új növekedési pályára állításában [The Role of Foreign Capital in the Formation of Hungary’s New Path of Growth]. Európai Tükör 4: 25–40. Pitti

Restricted access

Is globalization a driver of economic growth and social development?

A cross-national, quantitative perspective on current, pro-globalist strategies of the European Union

Society and Economy
Author: Arno Tausch

Dixon, W. J. — Boswell, T. (1996): Dependency, Disarticulation, and Denominator Effects: Another Look at Foreign Capital Penetration. American Journal of Sociology 102(2): 543–562. Boswell T

Restricted access

excessive credit growth) may lead to an increase of foreign capital inflows, which via currency exchange appreciation may in turn increase the risk of foreign currency exposures. Prolonged expansive monetary policy induces the over-indebtedness of households

Full access

) are sink-OFCs, which attract and retain foreign capital via low taxation and lenient regulation. Since my focus is also on the income distribution implications of public spending and tax decisions, I look at labour taxes for different types of earners

Open access