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, C. , ANTONA , C. , ROBERT , B. , LOPEZ , C. , ARMAND , M. ( 2014 ): The size and interfacial composition of milk fat globules are key factors controlling triglycerides bioavailability in simulated human gastro-duodenal digestion . Food

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Acta Veterinaria Hungarica
Authors: István Anton, Katalin Kovács, László Fésüs, József Várhegyi, László Lehel, Zoltán Hajda, J. Polgár, Ferenc Szabó, and Attila Zsolnai

., Schwerin, M. and Fries, R. (2004): Evidence for multiple alleles at the DGAT1 locus better explains a quantitative trait locus with major effect on milk fat content in cattle. Genetics 167 , 1873–1881. Fries R

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Kumar, M.V. , Sambaiah, K. & Lokesh, B.R. (2000): Hypocholesterolemic effect of anhydrous milk fat ghee is mediated by increasing the secretion of biliary lipids. J. Nutr. Biochem. , 11 , 69

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, J. , Dankow , A. , Gut , A. & Pikul , J. ( 2001 ): Fatty acid composition and cholesterol content of sheep and goat milk fat during lactation . Arch. Tierzucht. , 44 , 299 – 308 .

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Huber, J. T., Emery, R. S., Bergen, W. G., Liesman, J. S., Kung, L., King, K. J., Gardner, R. W. and Checketts, M. (1984): Influences of methionine hydroxy analog on milk fat production, blood serum lipids and

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gene on milk fat and milk protein percentage in Jersey cattle. Regarding most of the milk constituent percentages of CC and CT in Ongole cattle, no significant inferences could be drawn by comparing the genotypes because the values were almost

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. and Bauman, D. E. (2007): Trans-10 octadecanoic acid does not reduce milk fat synthesis in dairy cows. J. Nutr. 137 , 71–76. Bauman D. E. Trans-10 octadecanoic acid does not

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It was possible to determine the liquid fat content and melting behaviour of butters unenriched and enriched in low melting point milk fat fraction (mp=10‡C) made from traditionally (6-11-11‡C) and heat step technology ripened (6-20-11‡C) cream by using EPR spectroscopy and ultrasensitive DSC methods.

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The present investigation was undertaken to optimize the level of ingredients (milk fat, sugar, and mango pulp) for functional dairy beverage using Response Surface Methodology. Central Composite Rotatable Design with milk fat (%), sugar (%), and mango pulp (var. Chaunsa, %) as independent variables produced 20 different combinations that were used to investigate the effect on viscosity (cP), antioxidant activity, and overall acceptability. The response surface three dimensional graphs were plotted as a function of two variables to show the effect of level of ingredients on physico-chemical and sensory properties of the beverage. Significant correlation models were established with the coefficient of correlation (R2) greater than 0.8. An optimization of process variables was attempted for maximum antioxidant activity and overall acceptability. ANOVA tables revealed that increase in fat and sugar levels lowered the antioxidant activity, while enhancement of mango pulp significantly increased both antioxidant activity and overall acceptability of the beverage. The optimized levels of ingredients were 0.5% milk fat, 6.0% sugar and 30% mango pulp.

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Abstract  

DSC can be used to quickly determine if a product labeled as butter is actually a recombined butter made without milk. Recombined butter is manufactured from anhydrous milk fat, skim milk powder, water, salt, and lecithin. Melting profiles of tempered samples of natural butter and recombined butter were alike, but DSC curves from 5 to 25°C of untempered refrigerated samples revealed that the enthalpy of the melting transition around 17–20°C was much higher for natural butter than for recombined butter. The procedure for differentiating the two products can be completed in less than 20 min.

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