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: Cr = crustose, Fo = foliose, + = present, – = absent). For host plant names see Table 3. Lichen species Family Habit

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://www.index-fungorum.org/ IPNI ( 2019 ): International Plant Names Index (IPNI) . – Retrieved from: https://www.ipni.org/ Katenin , A. E

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Acta Chromatographica
Authors:
Filip Šibul
,
Dejan Orčić
,
Sanja Berežni
,
Goran Anačkov
, and
Neda Mimica-Dukić

daisy, corn feverfew, wild chamomile, false chamomile, false mayweed, or bachelor's button [ 13 ]. In Nordic countries, scentless mayweed is also called Balder's brae, an ancient plant name used to describe T. inodorum [ 14 ]. It is commonly found

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follows the International Plant Name Index (IPNI, https://www.ipni.org/ ), and it conforms to that of Fennane and Ibn Tattou (2005) , Ibn Tattou and Fennane (2008) as well as that of the Synonymic index of the North African flora ( Dobignard and

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Powell , C. E . ( 1992 ): Authors of plant names. A list of authors of scientific names of plants, with recommended standard form of their names including abbreviations . – Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew , 732 pp

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Abstract

Few studies have explored the relevance of metrical structures in segmental processes. This paper shows that Dagbani (Gur, Ghana), has a prosodic word dominating a trochaic foot which licenses segmental processes and phonotactics. The foot is the domain for marked vowels and unmarked consonants. The prosodic word regulates the sequencing of syllables of different degrees of sonority and weight within a word. The Optimality Theoretic analyses make use of classical metrical theory and prosodic principles used in defining the prosodic word in stress languages to highlight the typological relevance of these principles and the prosodic universality of these metrical structures.

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, comprehensive taxonomic and chorological studies as well as national floras were preferred. The publications, on which the evaluation of endemism was based, are listed in respective tables in the column “Reference” (Appendix 3). Plant names mostly follow The

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(László), king of Hungary (1077–95) in the Nomenclator of Hungarian plant names, too, together with other sagas. 94 Whatever Clusius believed about the legend itself, he seems to have suspected that those were extraordinary stones, perhaps of a metallic

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