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Apart from short stories, Borislav Stanković (1875–1927) finished only a play ( Koštana ) and a novel ( Nečista krv ). Still, his œuvre is consistent and full of energy.

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completed sections of one of her short stories in sequels with Flaks, whose experiences as a reader – with the manuscript of the short story – will make part of the novel. The short story begins in accordance with the realist traditions of the 19th century

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This study examines how 19th-century Russian literary tradition is manifested in L. Ulitskaya’s short story Sonechka; a tradition which poses questions in the field of the philosophy of artistic creation through the portrayal of painters and their paintings. L. Ulitskaya’s short story does not directly evoke this 19th-century tradition; it is transmitted into the textual world of Sonechka by a 20th-century novel, V. Nabokov’s Camera Obscura. The revelation of the intertextual connection between the two works sheds light on the connection between Ulitskaya’s short story and the tradition cited above.

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Antike und Christentum

Zur Überlagerung intertextueller Bezugnahmen in Heinrich Bölls Kurzgeschichte „Wanderer, kommst du nach Spa...“

Studia Slavica
Author:
Magdolna Orosz

The analysis of the narrative structure in a short story of Heinrich Böll reveals some deeper motivic relations which are interrelated with intertextual elements suggesting the opposition of cultural and moral values to be interpreted in an oscillating reception process.

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The heroine of L. Ulitskaya’s Sonechka is reading a play by Schiller. The work, which seems to be entirely unmotivated on the level of the plot, proves to be an exceptionally important code with regard to the poetics and esthetics of Ulitskaya’s short story. This paper examines how the Russian author revives Schiller’s game theory and how the short story itself can be interpreted on the basis of esthetic game theories.

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The following study shows metaphorical meanings of a verb(païr) that comes from the religious tradition. Two texts will be presented: a poem of Raimbaut d'Aurenga and an occitan short story. Both speak about love and both use païr in a somewhat unusual way. In the poem, païr expresses love of the Domna; in the short story, after their marriage, lovers take new names and the wife has one that contains païr. The study tries to reveal a possible literary relationship between semantic fields of païr and aimer.

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Abstract

Mikhail Bulgakov's fantastic short story The Fatal Eggs (1925) was translated into English by five translators, Mirra Ginsburg (1964), Kathleen Gook-Horujy (1990), Hugh Aplin (2003), Michael Karpelson (2010), and Roger Cockrell (2011). The emphasis in this research is on the linguistic analysis of the translations of cultural, social and historical realia referred to as Sovietisms, which pertain to items characteristic of Soviet discourse in the 1930s. Bulgakov's language is brimming with Soviet vocabulary that refers to various cultural and socio-political elements of Soviet reality. A complete naturalization or even omission of Sovietisms may lead to loss of connotative meanings essential to understanding the context, while foreignizing through transliteration or calquing may disturb the fluency of reading. The purpose of the analysis is to assess the translators' choices and what they imply for the readers. Another aim is to test the assumptions of re-translation theory (Bensimon 1990; Gambier 1994), which states that early translations are more target-oriented than subsequent translations. The analysis employs taxonomies suggested by Vlakhov and Florin (1980) and Mokienko and Nikitina (1998) for the classification of Sovietisms, and Aixelá’s taxonomy of translation strategies (1996) as the grounds for the case study.

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The aim of the present paper is to reveal the allegorical and metaphorical plan of L. Tolstoy’s short story The Death of Ivan Ilyich through the problems of human and family relationships. The main aspects are rounded off by analysing the connected details.

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Gyula Krúdy (1878-1933) produced the main bulk of his fictional work in the period 1897-1920, when Modernist writing in Hungary was initially dominated by the short story as the medium of experiment and innovation. The basic form of his prodigious output was, similarly to a number of other important prose authors of the period, the short story. His highly influential work has an elusive quality: it is unclassifiable, and general critical labels such as Symbolism, Impressionism and Surrealism have been of partial and dubious help in discussions of his writing. Approached from a technical point of view, the underlying narrative strategy of Krúdy's work can be identified as serial accumulation, with its attendant openness of form: the short-story sequence, the story-tagged-on-the-previous-story organisation of his novels, the historically pre-novelistic frame-tale-like coordination of various narrative forms. This is particularly evident in the case of Szindbád, Krúdy's crowning achievement in fiction, which came into being as an ever expanding series of short stories, novels and “dreams”, held together by their protagonist, the symbolically reimagined figure of Sindbad the Sailor, the mythic wanderer of The Arabian Nights. Infused with the lyricism of conjugal Eros and Thanatos, the stories develop, and give variations on, the central character as a composite symbol, the manifold meanings of which range from authorial self-dramatisation to a philosophical vision of Man as metaphysical superfluity.

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This study deals with a so far not too often analysed old Provençal short story, which is a particular version of Sleeping Beauty. After an analysis of biblical vocabulary background and a presentation of various hidden oppositions in the novas, the paper focuses on the meaning of the speaking names, on the miracles and on the duplicated persons. As the second young couple plays a crucial role in the plot, it is necessary to find its identity and comprehensive literary function. The study concludes affirming that the short story shows the decline of fin'amor by a charming mixture of Christian, antique and popular beliefs. Among the three, it is the third that prevails, as the magic herb seems strong enough to wake up the dead princess. Even though the fin'amors ideology is still present, it is not predominating any more and cannot resolve the greatest human tragedy.

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