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. , & Pollock , A. ( 2007 , June 2 ). Waiting list and waiting time statistics in Britain: A critical review . Retrieved from http://www.allysonpollock.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/04/CIPHP_2008_Godden

Open access
Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors: Alexandra Torres-Rodríguez, Mark D. Griffiths, Xavier Carbonell, and Ursula Oberst

, Lavarenne, & Lecomte, 2014 ). The control group also received psychological attention, because the use of the waiting list was considered unethical according to the following considerations: (a) the participants were

Open access
Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors: Martina Goslar, Max Leibetseder, Hannah M. Muench, Stefan G. Hofmann, and Anton-Rupert Laireiter

psychological treatment (without restrictions around mode of delivery, setting, or duration of treatment); (b) used a randomized or quasi-randomized controlled study design, such as wait-list (WL) controls, participants not receiving treatment, assessment only

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therapy, or behavior-based educational programming. Studies were also analyzed for the type of control (e.g., waiting list, no treatment, and treatment as usual). The relevant data were extracted by the two authors. The authors (raters) then coded these

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-based cognitive behavioral intervention improves sexual functioning versus wait-list control in women treated for gynecologic cancer . Gynecologic Oncology, 125, 320 – 325 . doi: 10.1016/j.ygyno.2012.01.035 10.1016/j.ygyno.2012

Open access
Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors: Martina Goslar, Max Leibetseder, Hannah M. Muench, Stefan G. Hofmann, and Anton-Rupert Laireiter

-randomized controlled study designs including wait-list controls, participants not receiving treatment, alternative active treatments, or a placebo intervention; (3) treated participants with the diagnosis of IA, SA, or CB; (4) measured at least one of the outcome

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. , Beck , T. , & Stark , L. ( 2013 ). Can reduce - the effects of chat-counseling and web-based self-help, web-based self-help alone and a waiting list control program on

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Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors: Simone Rodda, Stephanie S. Merkouris, Charles Abraham, David C. Hodgins, Sean Cowlishaw, and Nicki A. Dowling

intervention control group includes a wait list or assessment only control. There is no passive or active intervention. Active control group Active control group are

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findings by randomized-control trials using a wait-listed and/or active control group (assigned to a control intervention) to support our conclusions. In addition, future studies are needed to support whether the effects observed with respect to behavioral

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