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Abstract  

International co-authorship is generally thought and often found to have positive effects on the citation rate of scientific publications. We study the effect quantitatively in the example of four major and four medium Hungarian universities. The conclusions may be generalized to other countries of similar international status.

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Summary  

Many studies have analyzed “direct” partnerships in co-authorship networks. On the other hand, the global network structure, including “indirect” links between researchers, has not yet been sufficiently studied. This study analyzes researchers' activities from the viewpoints considering their roles in the global structures of co-authorship networks, and compares the co-authorship networks between the theoretical and application areas in computer science. The modified HITS algorithm is used to calculate the two types of importance of researchers in co-authorship networks, i.e., the importance as the leader and that as the follower.

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Abstract  

Given extensive research collaboration in modern science, both at thenational and international level, one might wonder whether the network ofresearchers within each discipline is now sufficiently meshed that a largeproportion of contributors to peer-reviewed journals in a given field couldeither share joint publications or, more realistically, be connected throughchains of co-authorships. Such is not the case yet in the fields of probabilityand statistics, however, as shown here using a large data base covering 9reknown journals from each of these two areas over the period 1986-1995.

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Abstract  

About ten years ago a new research field called “webometrics” emerged. Similarities between methods used in webometrics and scientometrics or informetrics are evident from the literature. Are there also similarities between scientometric and Web indicators of collaboration for possible use in technology policy making? Usually, the bibliometric method used to study collaboration is the investigation of co-authorships. In this paper, Web hyperlinks and Web visibility indicators are examined to establish their usefulness as indicators of collaboration and to explore whether similarities exist between Web-based structures and bibliographic structures. Three empirical studies of collaboration between institutions and individual scientists show that hyperlink structures at the Web don’t reflect collaboration structures collected by bibliographic data. However Web visibility indicators of collaboration are different from hyperlinks and can be successfully used as Web indicators of collaboration.

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Abstract  

This paper introduces a new approach to detecting scientists’ field mobility by focusing on an author’s self-citation network, and the co-authorships and keywords in self-citing articles. Contrary to much previous literature on self-citations, we will show that author’s self-citation patterns reveal important information on the development and emergence of new research topics over time. More specifically, we will discuss self-citations as a means to detect scientists’ field mobility. We introduce a network based definition of field mobility, using the Optimal Percolation Method (Lambiotte & Ausloos, 2005; 2006). The results of the study can be extended to selfcitation networks of groups of authors and, generally also for other types of networks.

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Abstract  

Although there are many measures of centrality of individuals in social networks, and those centrality measures can be applied to the analysis of authors’ importance in co-authorship networks, the distribution of an author’s collaborative relationships among different communities has not been considered. This distribution or extensity is an important aspect of authors’ activity. In the present study, we will propose a new measure termed extensity centrality, taking into account the distribution of an author’s collaborative relationships. In computing the strength of collaborative ties, which is closely related to the extensity centrality, we choose Salton’s measure. We choose the ACM SIGKDD data as our testing data set, and analyze the result of authors’ importance from different points of view.

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Abstract  

This paper focuses on methods to study patterns of collaboration in co-authorship networks at the mesoscopic level. We combine qualitative methods (participant interviews) with quantitative methods (network analysis) and demonstrate the application and value of our approach in a case study comparing three research fields in chemistry. A mesoscopic level of analysis means that in addition to the basic analytic unit of the individual researcher as node in a co-author network, we base our analysis on the observed modular structure of co-author networks. We interpret the clustering of authors into groups as bibliometric footprints of the basic collective units of knowledge production in a research specialty. We find two types of coauthor-linking patterns between author clusters that we interpret as representing two different forms of cooperative behavior, transfer-type connections due to career migrations or one-off services rendered, and stronger, dedicated inter-group collaboration. Hence the generic coauthor network of a research specialty can be understood as the overlay of two distinct types of cooperative networks between groups of authors publishing in a research specialty. We show how our analytic approach exposes field specific differences in the social organization of research.

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Abstract  

International co-operation has strongly intensified during the last decades owing to rapid developments in scientific communication. Economic, political, and intra-scientific factors also strongly influence international collaboration links among individual countries. Obviously research results of international scientific co-operation are reflected in the documented scientific communication as international co-authorship links in scientific publications. Most bibliometric studies on this issue pertain to the share of international co-authored papers in national publication output and their impact on national and international research, or to the analysis and mapping of the structure of collaboration links. The present study attempts to develop a model to measure and analyse the extent of multilateral international co-authorship links. A new indicator, the Multilateral Collaboration Index (ρ) is introduced and analysed as a function of the share of internationally co-authored papers (f). Based onf a series expansion approach is applied that can be considered an extension of a fractionation model byNederhof andMoed and allows classifying the extent of multilateral links both among science fields and among individual countries. The paper is concluded by a first attempt to estimate the errors involved in our approach.

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Abstract  

The present study is focused on international collaboration in science, involving more than two countries. The authors developed a promising model to measure and analyse the extent of multilateral co-authorship links in a previous study. The model is based on a series expansion approach which relates a new indicator, the Multilateral Collaboration Index (ρ), to the share of internationally co-authored papers (f). The model was found suitable to classify both the share of international papers, as well as the extent of multilateral links through the deviations from their expectations. A comparative analysis is made of changing collaboration patterns between 1983 and 1993 for 8 selected subfields, as well as all fields combined of the most active 38 countries. As expected an intensification of international scientific collaboration was observed, especially for a number of former COMECON countries. Different types of behaviour for different countries and science subfields emerged.

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the analysis of (2) scientific journals from the same fields. We will analyse ‘career-specific’ patterns of publication activity, citation impact and co-authorship dynamics along the following research questions. 1. In how far does citation impact

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