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Summary

The Intercession scene on top of the Late Gothic retable of St. George in Szepesszombat is interpreted here on the base of the arrows in the hand of God Father as related to the iconography of pest epidemy.

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Summary

A drawing kept in the Nuremberg Germanisches Nationalmuseum is here attributed to Bartholomäus Strobel and its iconography is described as a rare allegoric representation of the Road of human life.

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Abstract

The feminine Rococo appearence of the Premonstratensian Nuns’ Convent in Chotěšov (West Bohemia) was due to the frescoes executed in 1754 by Franz Julius Lux. The mystical Marian iconography of the Chapterhouse frescoes corresponds to a Premonstrensian tradition.

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Workshops of sarcophagi in Aquincum and Brigetio. This contribution deals with problems of chronology, iconography and decoration of the sarcophagi of Aquincum and Brigetio. For the chronology the inscriptions, which name the cities as municipium or colonia are more helpful than the dates of the stationing of the legio I adiutrix and the legio II adiutrix respectively. Regarding the iconography of the many sarcophagi with erotes in the fields on both sides of the inscription the type of this representations is decisive.

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Hinkle, William M. : The Portal of the Saints os Reims Cathedral . A Study of Mediaeval Iconography , New York , 1965 . Hinz 1996

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Summary

Recent research has increasingly questioned the “grand dichotomy” between “Paganism” and Christianity and brings into light the prominence of spaces with shared meanings in diverse cults related to mystic beliefs and practices. An excellent example is Vibia's tomb within Praetextatus' catacomb, on the Via Appia. Dated to the 4th century AD, this place combines epigraphy and a fascinating iconography pointing to a mystic initiation of the deceased within a syncretic context.

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The first prominent creation of the Hungarian romantic architecture is Count István Károlyi’s (1797–1881) church in Fót. It attributes to its importance that it was designed by the young Miklós Ybl (1814–1891), and the similar artistic principles and imagination of the Maecenas and the architect created a harmonic set of buildings (church, parsonage, school). The study outlines the known facts of the church, and based on those, attempts to assemble the church’s iconography and chronology.

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The casket scenes in The Merchant of Venice are powerful arbiters of success and failure. The casket challenge is loaded with culturally-specific signifiers which favour local contenders. Bassanio rejects the gold casket because he is aware that European moral iconographies repudiate earthly wealth (though, ironically, Bassanio is a poor illustration of the principle). The Prince of Morocco, by contrast, understandably supposes gold to be an appropriate metaphor for love – gold was, after all, the prima materia of North Africa. Morocco is on every level more worthy than Bassanio but fails because he chooses through foreign eyes.

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The article attempts to identify the possible origins of the iconography of a scene depicting Osiris in TT 65, the late Ramesside tomb of Imiseba. Revealing an apparent dependence on representations of the ruling king in Theban tombs of the early Eighteenth Dynasty, an analysis is presented of these, most particularly of that of the vizier Useramun (TT 131). Consequently, it also offers an argument in favour of considering the Middle Kingdom tomb TT 60 as providing the eventual model for the early Thutmoside scenes.

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On the East Pediment of the Parthenon on the Acropolis of Athens, completed in 432 BC, the Athenians saw a new image of Dionysos as a young man in relaxed attitude. In the following centuries, this new image was the main manifestation of this god in Greek art. Our hypothesis is that in Kratinos’ comedy Dionysalexandros, in Aristophanes’ Frogs, as well as in Euripides’ tragedy Bacchae the Dionysos on stage had to fit to his iconography. This paper is an attempt to reconstruct Dionysos’ figure as presented to the Athenians in the theatre and thus to better understand the message of the three plays.

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