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Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors:
Shan-Shan Ma
,
Chiang-Shan R. Li
,
Sheng Zhang
,
Patrick D. Worhunsky
,
Nan Zhou
,
Jin-Tao Zhang
,
Lu Liu
,
Yuan-Wei Yao
, and
Xiao-Yi Fang

Introduction Internet gaming disorder (IGD) represents a putative behavioral addiction that has been included as a condition deserving further studies by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders 5th Edition (DSM-5) ( American

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( Erceg, Flander, & Brezinšćak, 2018 ; Niall McCrae, Gettings, & Purssell, 2017 ; Piko, Milin, O’Connor, & Sawyer, 2011 ). Internet gaming disorder (IGD) and depression interact with each other and share neural mechanisms ( Choi et al., 2017

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Introduction Internet gaming has become a popular leisure activity, leading to growing worldwide concerns about excessive and problematic gaming ( Kuss & Griffiths, 2012 ). Since the American Psychiatric Association included Internet gaming disorder

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). Internet gaming disorder (IGD) is another mental disorder and behavioral problem that may have increased during the COVID-19 pandemic and it is a common comorbidity of depression ( Liu et al., 2018 ). IGD is defined as “persist and recurrent use of the

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, except in the case of severe symptoms. Prior to inclusion in the ICD-11, diagnostic criteria for Internet gaming disorder (IGD) were published by the American Psychiatric Association in the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental

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Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors:
Qian Zhao
,
Yongjun Zhang
,
Min Wang
,
Jiecheng Ren
,
Yijun Chen
,
Xueli Chen
,
Zhengde Wei
,
Jingwu Sun
, and
Xiaochu Zhang

Introduction Internet gaming disorder (IGD) is characterized by the excessive and repetitive use of Internet-based games that leads to serious impairments in psychological and social function ( Petry et al., 2014 ). Due

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Not good enough? Further comments to the wording, meaning, and the conceptualization of Internet Gaming Disorder

Commentary on: Chaos and confusion in DSM-5 diagnosis of Internet Gaming Disorder: Issues, concerns, and recommendations for clarity in the field (Kuss et al.)

Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors:
Elfrid Krossbakken
,
Ståle Pallesen
,
Helge Molde
,
Rune Aune Mentzoni
, and
Turi Reiten Finserås

In their commentary entitled “Chaos and confusion in DSM-5 diagnosis of Internet Gaming Disorder: Issues, concerns, and recommendations for clarity in the field,” Kuss, Griffiths, and Pontes ( 2016 ) criticize the use of the term “Internet” in

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The imperative of integrating empirical and theoretical considerations when developing policy responses to Internet-gaming disorder

Commentary on: Policy responses to problematic video game use: A systematic review of current measures and future possibilities (Király et al., 2018)

Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors:
Elisa Wegmann
and
Matthias Brand

with respect to the growing phenomenon of Internet-use disorder in general and Internet-gaming disorder (IGD), in particular. With including IGD in Section III in the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5

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; Petry et al., 2014 ). Gamers who persistently and uncontrollably engage in online gaming despite these negative consequences are considered to suffer from Internet gaming disorder (IGD) ( Petry et al., 2014 ). In view of the significant prevalence and

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Introduction In the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5; American Psychiatric Association [APA], 2013 ), Internet gaming disorder (IGD) has been included in the “Emerging

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