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justify seeing CSBD as a behavioral addiction. We will review the prevalence of CSBD and some of the findings regarding comorbidity with CSBD. We will then address the classification of CSBD by briefly reviewing impulsivity and compulsivity, and then we

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M. N. Potenza A. Weinstein D. A. Gorelick 2010 Introduction to behavioral addictions

Open access
Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors:
Johannes Fuss
,
Jared W. Keeley
,
Dan J. Stein
,
Tahilia J. Rebello
,
José Ángel García
,
Peer Briken
,
Rebeca Robles
,
Chihiro Matsumoto
,
Christoph Abé
,
Joël Billieux
,
Jon E. Grant
,
Shane W. Kraus
,
Christine Lochner
,
Marc N. Potenza
, and
Geoffrey M. Reed

, kleptomania, and pyromania ( Sadler, 2015 ). Despite these conceptual criticisms, it has become increasingly clear in recent years that impulse control disorders and behavioral addictions are relevant for public health either because they are prevalent

Open access
Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors:
Diego Cuppone
,
Luis J. Gómez Pérez
,
Stefano Cardullo
,
Nicola Cellini
,
Michela Sarlo
,
Silvia Soldatesca
,
Sonia Chindamo
,
Graziella Madeo
, and
Luigi Gallimberti

Introduction Behavioral addictions (BA) are increasingly recognized as a valid category of psychiatric disorder with relevant socio-cultural and economic implications ( Robbins & Clark, 2015 ). Despite the substantial progress in research on the

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. Z. Demetrovics M. D. Griffiths 2012 Behavioral addictions: Past, present and future Journal of Behavioral Addictions

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Introduction Addictive disorders, including behavioral addictions (BAs) and substance use disorders (SUDs), are widespread among young Swiss men ( Gmel et al., 2015 ; Marmet, Studer, Rougemont-Bücking, & Gmel, 2018 ). Although

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Introduction Digital features and technologies may constitute the development of behavioral addictions, which can lead to significant impairments of psychosocial functioning and widespread negative consequences ( Geisel, Lipinski, & Kaes, 2021

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Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors:
Ana Estévez
,
Paula Jáuregui
,
Inmaculada Sánchez-Marcos
,
Hibai López-González
, and
Mark D. Griffiths

Introduction Scientific research examining addiction has traditionally focused on substance abuse. However, over the past two decades, there has been increasing research into non-substance behavioral addictions ( Demetrovics

Open access

Abstract

Background/Aims

Studies have reported higher prevalences of four behavioral addictions (binge eating, compulsive shopping, hypersexuality, and pathological gambling) in dopamine agonist-treated Parkinson's disease relative to non-dopamine agonist-treated Parkinson's. However, recent case-control and epidemiological studies suggest that prevalences of behavioral addictions in dopamine agonist-treated Parkinson's may be similar to background population rates. This study tests that hypothesis by examining the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) for evidence of these associations, taking into account the potential impact of publicity on reporting rates.

Methods

FAERS reports in 2004 (pre-publicity for all but pathological gambling) and 2007 (post-publicity for all four behaviors) were analyzed. A threshold consisting of ≥3 cases, proportional reporting ratio ≥2, and χ2 with Yates' correction ≥4 was used to detect signals (drug-associated adverse reactions) involving any of five dopamine agonists and any of four behavioral addictions.

Results

No reports containing compulsive shopping and no signal for binge eating and dopamine agonists were found in either year. A weak signal was found for hypersexuality in 2004, with a stronger signal in 2007. A robust signal was found for pathological gambling in 2004, with a more robust signal in 2007.

Discussion/Conclusions

These results suggest that publicity may increase reporting rates in the FAERS. Findings for binge eating, compulsive shopping, and hypersexuality suggest that prevalences of these behaviors among those treated with dopamine agonists may be similar to background population rates and thus may not reflect an adverse safety signal. Further investigation of the relationship between dopamine agonists and behavioral addictions is warranted.

Open access

Introduction Gambling disorder (GD), a type of behavioral addiction, is characterized by persistent and recurrent maladaptive gambling behavior leading to significant deleterious legal, financial, and psychosocial consequences

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