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Ernst von Dohnányi visited Kristiania, nowadays Oslo, the first time in 1906. Receiving very good reviews, he became a frequent guest in the city playing usually for full concert halls. He came to the city numerous times as a soloist performing music of the leading European composers of the nineteenth century and Beethoven’s and Bach’s works as well. He appeared on the stages in Kristiania also as a chamber music performer. Besides, his music was played there being prized high. He was considered a permanent and very wanted guest in the city and became an artist recommended as a piano teacher to the young Norwegian students by for example Edvard Grieg. His name was also used by the Norwegian piano factory’s owners together with the names of other famous artists such as Leschetizky, Paderewski, Carreño and others in the commercials of the instruments for many years. Eventually, his music was played there not only by the artist. This article’s aim is to show all the aspects of presence and reception of Dohnányi’s art in Kristiania in the period the artist used to show up in the city’s musical life.

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Liszt’s interest in the figure of Jeanne d’Arc accompanied the composer throughout his life. He chose a poem by Alexandre Dumas père for the text of the romance dramatique Jeanne d’Arc au bûcher. After the first version for voice and piano published in 1846, the composer asked August Conradi for an instrumental arrangement. In 1858 Liszt planned a stage work on the subject of Jeanne d’Arc, but did not fulfill the plan and confined himself to revising the romance. In the 1860s Liszt composed three different new settings of Dumas’s text but never published them. After a rewriting in 1874 for voice and piano (or orchestra), the composer finally published his song (1876). With this, the list of the multiple settings is not yet complete. Some years ago the Fondazione Istituto Liszt (Bologna) bought an autograph manuscript for organ not included in the catalogues of Liszt’s works. This study reconstructs the story of the composition and performance of Jeanne d’Arc with organ accompaniment.

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Jelen tanulmány célja 1945 után keletkezett zongoradarabok nem-nyelvi jelrendszerének terminológiai vizsgálata. A vizsgálat eredményezte három csoport: a tág értelemben vett idővel kapcsolatos jelek (ütemmutatók; időegységek és szünetjelek; a tempóváltozás nem-nyelvi jelei; egyéb, időre vonatkozó jelek), a különféle díszítések és játékmódok nem-nyelvi jelei (pl. néma hangok, arpeggio, glissando, preparált zongora), valamint az egyéb jelzések (pl. az improvizáció jele, színek). A terminusokat korábban nyelvi jeleknek gondolták, azonban körük egyre inkább kiterjed a nem-nyelvi jelekre (számokra, piktogramokra stb.) is. Arra, hogy egy terminus nem pusztán nyelvi jel lehet, bizonyítékot szolgáltat a zene terminológiája, ahol egyenértékűként kezelik ugyanazon terminus nyelvi és nem-nyelvi jelölőjét.

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-Musik” (chamber music), 2. “Sing- und Kirchen-Musik” (vocal and church music) and 3. “Forte-Piano” (piano music). In the first group are symphonies, overtures, concertante symphonies, concertos, serenades, septets and sextets, quintets, quartets, trios, and under

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The form of the second movement of the String Quartet in A major, Op. 7 is original not only in Dohnányi’s oeuvre but in music history in general, as well. This new musical idea is a fusion of two traditional forms: a variation and a ternary form. The theme of the movement is followed by four variations, but at the end of the second one there is an unexpected break: a contrasting Trio-like section comes in between and the flow of variations continues only after it finishes. This unique structure is analysed in detail for the first time in present study. Relying on analyses of Dohnányi’s compositions, this study traces similar formal characteristics in other works of the composer too. Finally, the article provides with an example for this hybrid form in one of its three closest relatives: the second movement of the Piano Quintet in Eb minor, Op. 26.

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This study analyzes the music critiques of Géza Csáth (1887–1919) on the interpretational achievements of the eminent European pianists Emil von Sauer, Leopold Godowsky, and Wilhelm Backhaus, who gave guest performances in Budapest from 1906 to 1912. By comparing Csáth’s opinions about the performances of the above mentioned pianists with those of the critics who wrote for Hungarian, German, Austrian, French and Serbian newspapers, the authors arrive to the conclusion that, at the time, artists were being more and more explicitly profiled exclusively as performers, while the practice of both composing and performing one’s own compositions, which had been customary, was slowly disappearing. The importance of the chosen critiques by Csáth lies first and foremost in the author’s comments, which indicate the changes happening in the piano practice in the late nineteenth and the early twentieth century.

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Bartók left behind over 300 folksong arrangements. In the field of vocal music, three series are based on Slovak folksongs: Five Slovak Folksongs for male choir (1917, BB 77), Four Slovak Folksongs for mixed choir and piano (1917, BB 78) and Village Scenes (1924, 1926, BB 87). The series are strongly connected among themselves in terms of textual content, formal concept, and treatment of folk melodies. In Village Scenes, Stravinsky’s influence is unmistakable. Not only was Bartók “influenced” by Stravinsky but he also imitated and even “quoted” Les Noces (1923). The article examines the relationship between the two works using Bartók’s 1928 essay Hungarian Folk Music and New Hungarian Music as a point of reference.

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According to the evidence of an entry in the so-called Lichnowsky sketchbook, at the beginning of the 1840s, Franz Liszt proposed - in addition to the Swiss and Italian books - also a German volume to his cycle Années de pèlerinage. The study deals with this compositional plan, identifying and analysing the pieces referred to in the sketchbook. Interestingly, the plan consists rather of vocal works than piano pieces including the titles of nationalistic male choruses and romantic Rheinlieder inspired by German poets such as Ernst Moritz Arndt, Theodor Körner, Heinrich Heine and Felix Lichnowsky. The study also examines the autobiographical and political background of the proposed volume, which seems to be in close connection partly with Liszt's German concert tours, partly with the contemporary French-German conflict concerning the national identity of the Rhinland.

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György Kurtág's music makes extensive musical and extra-musical reference in ways which are often highly personal, yet the instructions which he gives to his performers are very often unclear, ambiguous, or even confusing. Through the examination of a small number of Játékok, centring on the 'Hommage à Tchaikovsky', the author demonstrates the compositional motivations behind some of this music. The discussion covers the use of musical reference and near-quotation, notation and performance physicality. These are also pieces which are situated within a pedagogical framework, and so inspire a particular relationship between the composer and his interpreter. In the 'Hommage à Tchaikovsky', Kurtág's idiosyncratic reinterpretation of the B flat minor Concerto is transformed into a direct engagement with the very physical experience of playing the piano. Through the analysis of complementary works this paper shows how this transmission of personal experience through musical and physical gesture seems crucial to Kurtág's compositional thought.

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Wagner or Beethoven?

Shifts in the Musical Taste of Virginia Woolf

Neohelicon
Author: Mihály Szegedy-Maszák

Abstract  

The essay focuses on the role music played in Virginia Woolf’s life and writings. By relying on information gleaned from her diaries, correspondence, essays, and fiction, on Leonard Woolf’s autobiography and his reviews of gramophone recordings, as well as on the critical and autobiographical works of their contemporaries, the author gives a detailed analysis of Virginia Woolf’s musical background and education. He sees continuity between her early opera-going experiences and her later interest in the string quartets and piano sonatas of Beethoven, arguing that a major artist never forgets the inspiration of early, formative years. Furthermore, this essay addresses complex questions of whether and how a comparison of music and literature can lead to a better understanding of Virginia Woolf’s works.

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