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Abstract  

Cadmium, thallium and lead are determined in environmental samples using the111,112,113Cd(p,xn)111In,203Tl(p,3n)201Pb and206,207,208Pb(p,xn)206Bi reactions.111In.201Pb and206Bi are chemically separated by anion exchange and anodic deposition of lead(IV). oxide. Detection limits are 6, 44 and 25 ng/g for cadmium, thallium and lead, respectively. The results obtained for certified reference materials are in good agreement with the certified values.

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Abstract  

Instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) has been employed in the investigation of mass balance for mercury species analysis in the analytical process. A new human hair reference material (IAEA-085) was analyzed for methylmercury using a solid/liquid extraction procedure, with samples of extracts, residues, and untreated samples being analyzed by INAA. The certified reference material NIES CRM No. 13, human hair, was analyzed in parallel. From the results obtained through the mass balance studies, it was found that the extraction procedure was quantitatively complete, and that there was no difference between the mass balance of Hg and the total Hg in the untreated materials.

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Abstract  

Instrumental neutron activation analysis was used to determine selenium concentrations in several marine organisms including two certified reference materials /NRCC lobster hepatopancreas, NBS oyster tissue/ and one uncertified material /IAEA fish homogenate/. The76Se/n, /77mSe/T=17.4 s/ reaction was successfully employed to achieve an overall precision between 3–10% and detection limits between 0.3–0.6 g/g. The accuracy of the results, as compared to the certified values, was in excellent agreement with the NBS material and only slightly lower /9%/ for the NRCC material.

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Abstract  

Five copper alloys were prepared with modern powder metallurgical processes in the frame of the European project Improvement of Means of Measurement on Archaeological Copper-Alloys for Characterisation and Conservation (IMMACO) and certified for As, Pb, Sn and Zn mass fractions. Similar in their composition to archaeological bronze alloys, these Certified Reference Materials (CRMs) are to be used for calibration of XRF instruments for characterization of archaeological samples either in the laboratory or in the field. This paper presents and compares the successful contribution of our non-destructive analytical methods (k 0-NAA and PIXE) to the IMMACO project and to the certification of the five reference materials.

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Abstract  

The effectiveness of a Compton suppression system (CSS) for instrumental neutron activation analysis of plant materials was evaluated. Suppression factors were measured with 137Cs sources. Five certified reference materials were analyzed and the detection limits calculated from both suppressed and unsuppressed spectra were compared. The CSS demonstrated to be useful for lowering the detection limits of ten out of sixteen elements tested, showing a maximum improvement factor of 3.9. The system performance was strongly influenced by the sample composition and also by the measurement conditions, indicating the importance of testing each individual sample type and analytical protocol.

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Abstract  

A fast pneumatic transfer facility was installed in Nuclear Engineering Teaching Laboratory (NETL) of the University of Texas at Austin for the purpose of cyclic thermal and epithermal neutron activation analysis. In this study efforts were focused on the evaluation of cyclic epithermal neutron activation analysis (CENAA). Various NIST and CANMET certified materials were analyzed by the system. Experiment results showed 110Ag with its 25 s half-life as one of the isotopes favored by the system. Thus, the system was put into practical application in identifying silver in metallic ores. Comparison of sliver concentrations as determined by CENAA in CANMET certified reference materials gave very good results.

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Abstract  

Instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) was applied to assess element concentrations in eleven samples of mineral supplements/multivitamins acquired in drugstores and pharmacies in São Paulo city, SP, Brazil. Concentrations of Ca, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Na, Se and Zn were determined. A comparison was made between the results obtained with the labels of the mineral supplents. Certified reference materials, NIST SRM1400 Bone Ash and NIST SRM 1633b Coal Fly Ash were analyzed for quality control of the analytical results.

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Abstract  

Neutron activation analysis was applied to assess trace element concentrations in brain tissues from normal (n = 21) and demented individuals (n = 21) of both genders aged more than 50 years. Concentrations of the elements Br, Fe, K, Na, Rb, Se and Zn were determined. Comparisons were made between the results obtained for the hippocampus and frontal cortex tissues, as well as, those obtained in brains of normal and demented individuals. Certified reference materials, NIST 1566b Oyster Tissue and NIST 1577b Bovine Liver were analyzed for quality of the analytical results.

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Summary  

The k 0-method in INAA has been used at CENA/USP Brazil for analyzing geological and biological materials. With the acquisition of a well-type detector, it was realized that the true-coincidence effects, originally corrected by semi-empirical procedures with the in-house k 0-software (Quantu-INAA), would affect the accuracy of results. Thus, new coincidence correction algorithms were developed, based on a theoretical equation for obtaining the correction factors. Validation of the algorithms was performed by analysis of plant certified reference materials.

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Abstract  

A simple procedure for the determination of90Sr in environmental samples is described. The method uses the different solubilities of the oxalates of calcium and strontium in presence of a large excess of calcium. For this reason the method is especially suited for Ca-rich samples, as e.g., bones or soils. However, after addition of supplementary calcium it works equally well for other types of samples. The method was tested by analyzing the IAEA Certified Reference Materials soil, animal bone and algae.

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