Search Results

You are looking at 41 - 50 of 273 items for :

  • "Co-authorship" x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All

Without Abstract

Restricted access

Abstract  

A review of selected parameters of the growth of scientific collaboration over the last century provides further confirmation of the dependency of teamwork on the increasing professionalization of science. Analysis reveals significant inaccuracies in current views of the recency and prevalence of collaborative research, and affords a more correct picture of twentieth century developments. A change in the growth rate of the practice of scientific collaboration at about the time of World War I, and indications of associations of teamwork with financial support and research publication in leading journals are discussed. Characteristics of the natural history of scientific collaboration signify that collaboration reflects relationships of dependency within a hierarchically stratified professional community, and serves as a means of professional mobility. As such, it continues to fulfil its original functions.

Restricted access

Abstract

I propose a new method (Pareto weights) to objectively attribute citations to co-authors. Previous methods either profess ignorance about the seniority of co-authors (egalitarian weights) or are based in an ad hoc way on the order of authors (rank weights). Pareto weights are based on the respective citation records of the co-authors. Pareto weights are proportional to the probability of observing the number of citations obtained. Assuming a Pareto distribution, such weights can be computed with a simple, closed-form equation but require a few iterations and data on a scholar, her co-authors, and her co-authors’ co-authors. The use of Pareto weights is illustrated with a group of prominent economists. In this case, Pareto weights are very different from rank weights. Pareto weights are more similar to egalitarian weights but can deviate up to a quarter in either direction (for reasons that are intuitive).

Open access

Abstract  

It is widely recognized that collaboration between the public and private research sectors should be stimulated and supported, as a means of favoring innovation and regional development. This work takes a bibliometric approach, based on co-authorship of scientific publications, to propose a model for comparative measurement of the performance of public research institutions in collaboration with the domestic industry collaboration with the private sector. The model relies on an identification and disambiguation algorithm developed by the authors to link each publication to its real authors. An example of application of the model is given, for the case of the academic system and private enterprises in Italy. The study demonstrates that for each scientific discipline and each national administrative region, it is possible to measure the performance of individual universities in both intra-regional and extra-regional collaboration, normalized with respect to advantages of location. Such results may be useful in informing regional policies and merit-based public funding of research organizations.

Restricted access

A similar pattern as for international co-authorship can be discerned in national co-authored papers. For France and Spain it is more common that corresponding author appears last in the byline for international co-authored papers while for national

Restricted access
Scientometrics
Authors:
Jacob B. Slyder
,
Beth R. Stein
,
Brent S. Sams
,
David M. Walker
,
B. Jacob Beale
,
Jeffrey J. Feldhaus
, and
Carolyn A. Copenheaver

to be particularly common in fields where co-authorship frequently includes both sexes (Copenheaver et al. 2010 ). The journal in which an article is published may also affect its citation rate. Regardless of an article's scholarly merit, the

Restricted access

private enterprises located on Italian territory in the period from 2001 to 2003, for which data were available. 1 To identify such collaborations the study resorts to the proxy of articles with university–industry co-authorship as indexed in the CD

Restricted access
Scientometrics
Authors:
Peng Hui Lv
,
Gui-Fang Wang
,
Yong Wan
,
Jia Liu
,
Qing Liu
, and
Fei-cheng Ma

increase as we can expect. Fig. 8 Annual cited times distribution of SCI papers Authorship and co-authorship of papers

Restricted access

–2000 . Scientometrics 63 : 321 – 339 10.1007/s11192-005-0215-1 . Laudel , G 2002 What do we measure by co-authorships? . Research Evaluation 11 : 3 – 15 10

Restricted access

. GlÄnzel , W. De Lange , C. 1997 Modelling and measuring multilateral co-authorship in international scientific collaboration. Part II. A comparative study on the extent and change of international

Restricted access