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„Én már hamu vagyok?” Kiégéskörkép – fókuszban a tanárok helyzetével

“Am I just ashes now?” Burnout landscape – focusing on teachers’ perspective

Mentálhigiéné és Pszichoszomatika
Authors:
Réka Szigeti
,
Noémi Balázs
, and
Róbert Urbán

Psychology , 26 ( 2 ), 86 – 107 . 10.1037/ocp0000208 Houkes , I ., Winants , Y ., Twellaar , M ., & Verdonk , P . ( 2011 ). Development of burnout over time and the causal order of the three dimensions of burnout among male and female GPs. A three

Open access
Physiology International
Authors:
Mithra Sudha Mohan
,
Aswani Sukumaran Sreedevi
,
Aparna Nandakumaran Sakunthala
,
Puthenpura T. Boban
,
Perumana R. Sudhakaran
, and
Saja Kamalamma

humans to microorganisms [ 31 ]. Elevated antioxidant enzyme may be due to increase in oxidative stress. Neri et al. reported that norepinephrine administration significantly increased antioxidant defence mechanisms such as GPS activity and SOD activity

Restricted access

and validation of the Grief Play Scale (GPS) in MMORPGs . Personality and Individual Differences, 114, 125 – 133 . doi: 10.1016/j.paid.2017.03.062 10.1016/j.paid.2017.03.062 Lin , S

Open access
Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors:
Melissa M. Norberg
,
Susanne Meares
,
Richard J. Stevenson
,
Jack Tame
,
Gary Wong
,
Paul Aldrich
, and
Jake Olivier

), 314 – 321 . https://doi.org/10.1002/gps.2531 . Mackin , R. S. , Vigil , O. , Insel , P. , Kivowitz , A. , Kupferman , E. , Hough , C. M. , … Mathews , C. A. ( 2016 ). Patterns of clinically significant cognitive impairment in hoarding

Open access
Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors:
Gaëlle Challet-Bouju
,
Bastien Perrot
,
Lucia Romo
,
Marc Valleur
,
David Magalon
,
Mélina Fatséas
,
Isabelle Chéreau-Boudet
,
Amandine Luquiens
,
JEU Group JEU Group
,
Marie Grall-Bronnec
, and
Jean-Benoit Hardouin

Background and aims

The aim of this study was to test the screening properties of several combinations of items from gambling scales, in order to harmonize screening of gambling problems in epidemiological surveys. The objective was to propose two brief screening tools (three items or less) for a use in interviews and self-administered questionnaires.

Methods

We tested the screening properties of combinations of items from several gambling scales, in a sample of 425 gamblers (301 non-problem gamblers and 124 disordered gamblers). Items tested included interview-based items (Pathological Gambling section of the DSM-IV, lifetime history of problem gambling, monthly expenses in gambling, and abstinence of 1 month or more) and self-report items (South Oaks Gambling Screen, Gambling Attitudes, and Beliefs Survey). The gold standard used was the diagnosis of a gambling disorder according to the DSM-5.

Results

Two versions of the Rapid Screener for Problem Gambling (RSPG) were developed: the RSPG-Interview (RSPG-I), being composed of two interview items (increasing bets and loss of control), and the RSPG-Self-Assessment (RSPG-SA), being composed of three self-report items (chasing, guiltiness, and perceived inability to stop).

Discussion and conclusions

We recommend using the RSPG-SA/I for screening problem gambling in epidemiological surveys, with the version adapted for each purpose (RSPG-I for interview-based surveys and RSPG-SA for self-administered surveys). This first triage of potential problem gamblers must be supplemented by further assessment, as it may overestimate the proportion of problem gamblers. However, a first triage has the great advantage of saving time and energy in large-scale screening for problem gambling.

Open access
Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors:
Lucia Romo
,
Cindy Legauffre
,
Alice Guilleux
,
Marc Valleur
,
David Magalon
,
Mélina Fatséas
,
Isabelle Chéreau-Boudet
,
Amandine Luquiens
,
Jean-Luc Vénisse
,
JEU Group JEU Group
,
Marie Grall-Bronnec
, and
Gaëlle Challet-Bouju

Introduction

The primary outcome of our study was to assess the links between the level of cognitive distortions and the severity of gambling disorder. We also aimed at assessing the links between patient gambling trajectories and attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

Materials and methods

The study population (n = 628) was comprised of problem and non-problem gamblers of both sexes between 18 and 65 years of age, who reported gambling on at least one occasion during the previous year. Data encompassed socio-demographic characteristics, gambling habits, the South Oaks Gambling Screen, the Gambling Attitudes and Beliefs Survey – 23, the Wender Utah Rating Scale – Child, and the Adult ADHD Self-report Scale.

Results

The cognitive distortions with the greatest correlation to the severity of gambling disorder were the “Chasing” and “Emotions.” These two dimensions were able to distinguish between problem gamblers seeking treatment or not. While age of onset of gambling and length of gambling practice were not associated with the level of distorted cognitions, a period of abstinence of at least 1 month was associated with a lower level of distorted cognitions. The presence of ADHD resulted in a higher level of distorted cognitions.

Conclusion

Cognitive work is essential to the prevention, and the treatment, of pathological gambling, especially with respect to emotional biases and chasing behavior. The instauration of an abstinence period of at least 1 month under medical supervision could be a promising therapeutic lead for reducing gambling-related erroneous thoughts and for improving care strategies of pathological gamblers.

Open access

. Zhang et al., 2020 ). Owing mobile phones enables us to connect with anyone, anywhere, and at any time; it also helps us stay organized, makes everyday chores easier via mobile apps, ensures stress-free travel via GPS apps or navigation apps, helps us

Open access
Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors:
Nikolaos Boumparis
,
Christian Baumgartner
,
Doris Malischnig
,
Andreas Wenger
,
Sophia Achab
,
Yasser Khazaal
,
Matthew T. Keough
,
David C. Hodgins
,
Elena Bilevicius
,
Alanna Single
,
Severin Haug
, and
Michael P Schaub

. , Penzenstadler , L. , Zullino , D. , & Khazaal , Y. ( 2014 ). Early detection of pathological gambling: Betting on GPs’ beliefs and attitudes . BioMed Research International , 2014 . https://doi.org/10.1155/2014/360585 . Allami , Y. , Hodgins , D. C

Open access
Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors:
Mohamed Ali Gorsane
,
Michel Reynaud
,
Jean-Luc Vénisse
,
Cindy Legauffre
,
Marc Valleur
,
David Magalon
,
Mélina Fatséas
,
Isabelle Chéreau-Boudet
,
Alice Guilleux
,
JEU Group
,
Gaëlle Challet-Bouju
, and
Marie Grall-Bronnec

Background and aims

Gambling disorder-related illegal acts (GDRIA) are often crucial events for gamblers and/or their entourage. This study was designed to determine the predictive factors of GDRIA.

Methods

Participants were 372 gamblers reporting at least three DSM-IV-TR (American Psychiatric Association, 2000) criteria. They were assessed on the basis of sociodemographic characteristics, gambling-related characteristics, their personality profile, and psychiatric comorbidities. A multiple logistic regression was performed to identify the relevant predictors of GDRIA and their relative contribution to the prediction of the presence of GDRIA.

Results

Multivariate analysis revealed a higher South Oaks Gambling Scale score, comorbid addictive disorders, and a lower level of income as GDRIA predictors.

Discussion and conclusion

An original finding of this study was that the comorbid addictive disorder effect might be mediated by a disinhibiting effect of stimulant substances on GDRIA. Further studies are necessary to replicate these results, especially in a longitudinal design, and to explore specific therapeutic interventions.

Open access

aged care facilities: A systematic review . International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 32 ( 2 ), 141 – 154 . doi: 10.1002/gps.4604 10.1002/gps.4604 De Jong Gierveld , J

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