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. Scher , F. M. & Baker , K. , 1980 . Mechanisms of biological control in a Fusariumsuppressive soil . Phytopathol. 70 . 412 – 417 . Schwyn

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Pot experiments using loamy soil were conducted to evaluate the effect of irrigation with industrial effluents on growth, uptake on growth, uptake of nutrients and yield of wheat (Triticum aestivumGiza 164) as a monocot and faba beans (Vicia fabaGiza 461) as a dicot plant. Also, irrigation by industrial effluents in combination with vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhiza (VAM) was used in trying to use a biological control to overcome the harmful effects of heavy metals pollution. Irrigation of plants with industrial effluents leads to marked changes in growth criteria depending on plant and/or the stage of growth. Industrial wastewater led also to marked changes in total carbohydrates and nitrogen in both shoots and roots. On the other hand, combination of industrial waste water with VAM caused an increase in the total carbohydrates and total nitrogen in shoots and roots of both wheat and bean plants. The yield components in wheat and bean were significantly increased with industrial effluents, but the biochemical concentrations were different. In wheat, the carbohydrate concentrations were increased, but protein- N and total-N were decreased, however mineral contents, especially ZN were increased. The reverse response was recorded with VAM. For bean the opposite occurred. Generally, bean plants were more sensitive to pollution with heavy metals, than those of wheat however this could influence be overcome by using VAM with irrigation.

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The need for more environmentally sound strategies of plant protection has become a driving force in physiological entomology to combat insect pests more efficiently. Since neuropeptides regulate key biological processes, these “special agents” or their synthetic analogues, mimetics, agonists or antagonists may be useful tools. We examined brain-suboesophageal ganglia and corpora cardiaca-corpora allata complexes of the cabbage moth, Mamestra brassicae , in order to obtain clues about possible peptide candidates which may be appropriate for the biological control of this pest. With the aid of bioassays, reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography, and mass spectrometry, five neuropeptides were unequivocally identified and the presence of a further three were inferred solely by comparing mass spectra with known peptides. Only one neuropeptide with adipokinetic capability was identified in M. brassicae . Data from the established homologous bioassay indicated that the cabbage moths rely on a lipid-based metabolism which is aided by an adipokinetic hormone (viz. Manse-AKH) that had previously been isolated in many different lepidopterans. Other groups of neuropeptides identified in this study are: FLRFamides, corazonin, allatostatin and pheromonotropic peptide.

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Dr. Barnabás Nagy

(1921–2020), a naturalist, orthopterologist, agrozoologist and forward-looking ecologist covered a rich scientific career. In commemoration of his significant contribution to entomology, we attempt to shed some light on a selection of his achievements. While devoted to his chosen insect order, Orthoptera, he was sensitive also to problems coming from everyday’s practice in controlling pests in agriculture. Consequently, he dealt with various pest species, belonging to a variety of insect taxa (Coleoptera, Lepidoptera, Hymenoptera). He always put the actual problem in ecological context. This may have helped him to recognize the need for an ecological approach in plant protection and to develop the pioneering concept of biological / ecological pest management, published in Hungarian, as early as in 1957. When arguing for his concept, he criticized the surplus usages of toxic pesticides and provided guidelines for facilitating the beneficial activity of the natural enemies of pests. This way he prepared the way for integrated pest management (IPM), preceding the international mainstream of his age. He held an active part in the International Organization for Biological Control (IOBC), as a founder of the International Working Group of Ostrinia (IWGO), and was the Head of the Department of Zoology of the Plant Protection Institute, Budapest, Hungary. He held several positions in the Hungarian Entomological Society (President, vice-President, Secretary, committee member), to that society he was engaged for 80 years. Here we cite only some of his most important, original entomological papers. He regularly published also in journals for popular science and gave lectures for the young generations of entomologists.

Curriculum vitae in a nutshell

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. Chumthong , A. , Kanjanamaneesathian , M. , Pengnoo , A. , Wiwattanapatapee , R. 2008 . Water-soluble granules containing Bacillus megaterium for biological control of rice sheath blight: Formulation, bacterial viability and efficacy

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213 222 Miller, D. 1970. Biological control of weeds in New Zealand 1927-1948. N. Z. Dept. Sci. Indust. Res. Inform. Ser. 74: 1-104. Biological

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, outcomes and biological control. In: Brodeur, J. and Boivin, G. (eds.), Trophic and Guild in Biological Interactions Control . Springer, Berlin, pp. 123–144. Brodeur J

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Acta Biologica Hungarica
Authors: L. Kredics, Kata Terecskei, Zsuzsanna Antal, A. Szekeres, L. Hatvani, L. Manczinger, and Cs. Vágvölgyi

Sclerotium cepivorum isolate on sclerotial degradation and biological control of white rot by Trichoderma. Plant Pathol. 53 , 353–362. Whipps J. M. Effect of environmental factors

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Acta Biologica Hungarica
Authors: Raheem Shahzad, Muhammad Waqas, Abdul Latif Khan, Khadija Al-Hosni, Sang-Mo Kang, Chang-Woo Seo, and In-Jung Lee

plant growth promotion and biological control of seedling disease of rice . Can. J. Microbiol. 47 , 916 – 924 . 2. Andrews , J. H. ( 1992 ) Biological control

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. (1986) Increased growth of plants in the presence of the biological control agent Trichoderma harzianum , Plant Disease 70 , 145–148. Chet I. Increased growth of plants in the

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