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Acta Linguistica Academica
Authors:
Alexis Wellwood
,
Susan J. Hespos
, and
Lance Rips

: Distributivity as a bridge between aspect and measurement . Oxford : Oxford University Press . Champollion , Lucas and Manfred Krifka . 2016 . Mereology . In M. Aloni and P. Dekker (eds.) The Cambridge handbook of formal semantics . Cambridge

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A bocsánatkérés és a jóvátétel hatása a megbocsátásra közeli és távoli kapcsolatokban

The impact of apology and compensation on forgiving in close and distant relationships

Magyar Pszichológiai Szemle
Authors:
Gábor Papp
and
Judit Kovács

HIEL , A. ( 2013 ). Money isn’t all that matters: The use of financial compensation and apologies to preserve relationships in the aftermath of distributive harm . Journal of Economic Psychology , 35 , 95 – 107

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Abstract

We prove that the family of all generalized topologies on a nonempty set is a lattice, neither distributive nor complemented. We define the direct sum of two generalized topologies and characterize the direct sum.

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This paper seeks to provide a full description of the syntactic behaviour of the enclitic co-ordinate conjunction - in the earliest stage of the Avestan language. By studying the occurrences of the particle in Ahunavaiti Gāthā, a distributive analysis is provided together with an interpretative hypothesis of its distributive dynamics. Two syntactic levels, phrase and sentence, are taken into consideration. Finally, a syntactic domain-based variation is argued and two clitic functional variants are identified as synchronically operating conjunction strategies.

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Abstract  

Closure algebras have been intensively studied in literature ([2], [3], [11], ...) but, up to now, little interest has been devoted to subalgebras of closure algebras. In this paper, the methods of [16] are adapted to characterize closure algebras with a distributive, or a Boolean, subalgebra lattice.

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Let D be a finite distributive lattice with more than one element and let G be a finite group. We prove that there exists a modular (arguesian) lattice M such that the congruence lattice of M is isomorphic to D and the automorphism group of M is isomorphic to G.

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This paper gives a classification of arithmetical affine complete varieties of finite type up to categorical equivalence. It is proved that two such varieties are equivalent as categories if and only if their weakly diagonal generators have isomorphic monoids of bicongruences. Moreover, it is proved that the monoids appearing in this situation are precisely the inverse factorizable monoids with zero, with distributive lattice of idempotents, and satisfying a certain idempotent-unit condition (IU).

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Abstract  

Insertion of lattice-valued functions in a monotone manner is investigated. For L a ⊲-separable completely distributive lattice (i.e. L admits a countable base which is free of supercompact elements), a monotone version of the Katětov-Tong insertion theorem for L-valued functions is established. We also provide a monotone lattice-valued version of Urysohn’s lemma. Both results yield new characterizations of monotonically normal spaces. Moreover, extension of lattice-valued functions under additional assumptions is shown to characterize also monotone normality.

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In this article, we define general normal forms for any logic that has propositional part and whose non-propositional connectives distribute over finite disjunctions. We do not require the non-propositional connectives to be closed on the set of formulas, so our normal forms cover logics with partial connectives too. We also show that most of the known normal forms in the literature are in fact particular cases of our general forms. These general normal forms are natural improvement of the distributive normal forms of J. Hintikka [6] and their modal analogues, e.g. [1] and [4].

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Property reparation programs undertaken in Central and Eastern Europe after the fall of the communist regimes fail to fulfill ‘the promises of the rule of law’. Reparation schemes do not have an exclusively reparative nature, moreover, reparation was deliberately linked with structural reform, and due to this duality, the scheme features a mixed distributive-reparative character. This resulted in two troublesome aspects: on one hand, there is no evidence of a compelling argument, which justifies the mitigation of past property deprivations at large. On the other hand, it can not be satisfactorily demonstrated why property-related injustices enjoy a privileged status when it comes to reparations, in comparison to other types of losses. Further, bearing in mind the Hayekian objection towards distributive justice, even those who had been placed in an equal situation—i.e. all suffered past property injustices—are not offered an objectively equal opportunity to claim redress. Due to the fact that the schemes addressed reparations—at least in part—from a distributive perspective (which resulted in an attempt to create a substantive equality between victims), the result that they achieved was objective inequality, as everyone was entitled to reparation between the same limitations, while everyone suffered losses of different extent. These differences in treatment between various former owners are mostly arbitrary, and in certain cases deliberately introduced so as to produce inequalities, and thereby meet the Hayekian concerns as far as they produce results that conflict with the idea of the rule of law. The analyzed provisions of the reparation schemes lead in practice to the creation of winners and losers of reparations, to a breach of the idea of formal equality before the law. In the conditions in which reparation schemes fall short from a thick conception of the rule of law (justice, rights or objective equality) it worth investigating, whether requirements of a thin reading-focusing on foreseability, clarity and consistency—are still met by post-communist property redistribution. Unfortunately at least under three aspects—valuation, time limits and probation—the reparation schemes’ provisions are not beyond criticism. The complexity of tasks that transition societies had to face is obvious and uncontested. Transitional law, according to Teitel, is a sui generis paradigm, a vehicle of social, political and ideological transformation. The amendments to the rule of law ideal, justifiable in the context of transition can go as far as—for example—to allow governments to decide upon the concrete form of the reparation, the type of wrongs it want to address, the period in time intended to be covered. But they may not create winners and losers; they may not distinguish between those placed in the same situation.

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