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Changes in the water content of aluminium sulphate hydrate were investigated gravimetrically at room temperature in air with different relative humidities. The samples conditioned in this way were characterized by thermoanalytical (TG, DTG, DSC) and X-ray diffraction measurements. Industrial aluminium sulphate hydrate obtained by freezing the melt has a partly crystalline structure. After grinding, this material crystallizes during storage. This process requires a humid atmosphere; increasing relative humidity brings about more intensive crystallization.

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Abstract  

The stability of Supersulphated Cement (SSC) is investigated at 95°C when subjected to relative humidities of 100, 53 and 11% of water vapour. Previously [1] investigations at 25, 50, 75°C under the same conditions of humidity reported the stability of ettringite, one of the initial hydration products. At 95°C, decomposition of ettringite, is found at all humidities and is rapid at 100% relative humidity. The hydration products of cement pastes at a water cement ratio of 0.27 were determined by thermogravimetry (TG) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The formation of the hydragarnet, plazolite is recorded during the decomposition/dehydration process enhanced by possible carbonation. Rehydration studies on the products after storage for up to 9 months were carried out using distilled water and the samples tested for ettringite content. It is concluded that ettringite in SSC is inherently unstable at 95°C.

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Abstract  

Aerosol particles smaller than 1.8 m were size-fractionated with micro-orifice impactors at two urban sites near Washington, DC, and analyzed for 44 elements including, As, Se, Sb, and Zn, i.e., elements strongly associated with coal combustion, incineration, and regionally transported secondary aerosol, by Instrumental Neutron Activation. Size distribution parameters were determined nonparametrically and with a least-squares peak-fitting method using impactor calibration data. Geometric and fitted mass mean aerodynamic diameters typically differed by <10% and increased continuously with increasing relative humidity (RH) in the range 56 to 79%, but along different curves for samples influenced by local and distant sources. The geometric mass mean diameters for samples influenced by winds from the direction of local sources were uniformly smaller than those influenced by westerly winds bearing aerosol from distant, regional, sources. At 60% RH, gmmads were As, 0.30±0.03 and 0.46±0.04; Se, 0.33±0.06 and 0.54±0.04; Sb, 0.39±0.03 and 0.53±0.04; and Zn, 0.39±0.06 and 0.53±0.08; respectively.

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Abstract  

The use of modulated temperature differential scanning calorimetry (TMDSC) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) in the measurement of the glass transition temperature (T g) in polymer-water systems presents several important problems. These include the presence of water evaporation endotherms, partial water evaporation during scanning, changes in pan integrity due to vapour pressure developing in the pan headspace during analysis, and possible interaction between water and polymer at high temperatures. As a result, in most of the cases, only apparent T g values can be obtained. In this study, TMDSC and DSC were used to determinate the thermal behaviour of methylmethacrylate copolymer-water systems. The samples were previously equilibrated at different relative humidities (RH) from 0 to 97% RH. Three different pan arrangements were used. In addition, thermogravimetric analysis (TG) was carried out to determine the initial amount of water in the sample. None of the pan arrangements was entirely suitable for the study of these systems. When sealed pans were used, the plastification effect of water was observed. Some evidence of degradation was also observed in which water and methylmethacrylate appeared to play roles.

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Journal of Thermal Analysis and Calorimetry
Authors: D. Giron, Ch. Goldbronn, M. Mutz, S. Pfeffer, Ph. Piechon, and Ph. Schwab

Abstract  

Manufacturing processes may involve the presence of water in the crystallization of the drug substance or in manufacturing or in the composition of the drug product through excipients. Dehydration steps may occur in drying, milling, mixing and tabletting processes. Furthermore, drug substances and drug products are submitted to different temperatures and relative humidities, due to various climatic conditions giving rise to unexpected hydration or dehydration aging phenomena. Therefore the manufacture and the characterization of hydrates is part of the study of the physical properties of drug substances. Several hydrates and even polymorphic forms thereof can be encountered. Upon dehydration crystal hydrates may retain more or less their original crystal structure, they can lose crystallinity and give anamorphous phase, they can transform to crystalline less hydrated forms or to crystalline anhydrous forms. The proper understanding of the complex polyphasic systemhydrates–polymorphs–amorphous state needs several analytical methods. The use of techniques such as DSC-TG, TG-MS, sorption-desorption isotherms, sub-ambient experiments, X-ray diffraction combined with temperature or moisture changes as well as crystal structure and crystal modelling in addition to solubilities and dissolution experiments make interpretation and quantitation easier as demonstrated with some typical examples.

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Abstract  

The interaction between samples of metallic zinc and water vapour was studied gravimetrically, both in the absence and in the presence of oxygen. The experimental total mass gain vs. time curves exhibited two plateaus, whose heights increased with, elevations both of relative humidity and of temperature. The amount of product retained on the surface after desorption was also determined as a function of time. The product was identified as hydrated zinc oxide. In the runs conducted without oxygen, the retained product curves displayed a time delay with respect to the total mass gain curves. In the presence of oxygen, however, there was practically only one chronogravimetric curve. This behaviour is interpreted on the basis of a common mechanism involving the formation of an intermediate precursor oxide, which is more readily formed in the presence of oxygen than in its absence. A set of mathematical equations was derived, from which the rate constants for both processes were obtained. The second step was ascribed to a further weak adsorption of water.

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Abstract  

The purpose of this study was to conduct a thermal analysis of the hydrolysis and degradation behavior of biodegradable polymers and bio-composites at 50°C and 90% relative humidity (RH). With increasing hydrolysis time, the thermal stability and degradation temperature of polybutylene succinate (PBS) slightly decreased. The glass transition temperature (T g) and melting temperature (T m) of PBS and the anti-hydrolysis agent treated PBS did not vary significantly with increasing hydrolysis time, whereas those of the trimethylolpropane triacrylate (TMPTA)-treated PBS slightly increased. With increasing hydrolysis time, the storage modulus (E’) values of the bio-composites decreased, whereas those of the TMPTA treated bio-composites slightly increased. Also, the tan values of the anti-hydrolysis agent and TMPTA treated PBS-BF bio-composites were slightly lower than those of the non-treated bio-composites, due to the reduction in their degree of hydrolysis. The tanδmax peak temperature (T g) of the anti-hydrolysis agent treated bio-composites was not significantly changed, whereas that of the TMPTA treated bio-composites was increased.

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Abstract  

The reactivity of MgO obtained from calcination of magnesium carbonate at different temperatures has been investigated by means of hydration in a constant relative humidity environment at 40°C for periods up to 24 days. Natural magnesite and AR grade basic MgCO3 calcined in the range of 500–1000°C was characterised in terms of surface area, crystallite size, morphology, and hydration rate. It was found that the hydration rate is dependent on the surface area and crystallite size where temperature was the main variable affecting them. The most reactive MgO was produced at the lowest calcination temperature with the highest surface area and the smallest crystallite size. The basic MgO specimens showed higher degree of hydration compared to the natural MgO specimens due to the smaller surface area and larger crystallite size. The low MgO content of the starting natural magnesite is also attributable to the lower reactivity. This preliminary study serves as a mean to investigate potential utilisation of reactive MgO as a supplementary cementitious material in eco-friendly cements.

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Abstract  

7Be activity concentrations were measured in the lower atmosphere at Thessaloniki, Northern Greece (40°38′N, 22°58′E) over the year 2009, a year of a particular minimum of solar activity. The mean annual activity concentration of 7Be at that year was 6.01 mBq m−3. The variability of 7Be surface concentrations related to the solar cycle appeared to be deviated about 40% between the maximum and the minimum values. A positive correlation (R = 0.97) was revealed between the activity concentrations of 7Be and the temperature, confirming that the increased rates of vertical transport within the troposphere, especially during the warmer months, resulted in carrying down to the surface layer air masses enriched in 7Be. Relatively high values of 7Be activity concentrations were observed by increasing of the tropopause height. A negative correlation (R = −0.65) between the 7Be activity concentrations and the relative humidity was due to the condensation process in the lower atmosphere which resulted in increased aerosol particle sizes with higher scavenging rates of aerosols and low activity concentrations of 7Be in the atmosphere. Influence of precipitation on the changes of 7Be activity concentrations was also observed.

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Abstract  

The seasonal variation of the 7Be activities in air and the size distribution of the 7Be aerosols were studied by using a continuous air sampler and a five stage cascade impactor. The mean monthly activity level of 7Be at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) site varied from 0.5 to 4.8 Bq·m−3 and revealed a seasonal variation, in which the 7Be activity levels were high in winter and low in summer. The mass size distribution showed a bi-modal distribution with a higher peak around 0.49 μm and a smaller peak between 3 μm and 7.2 μm. The activity median aerodynamic diameter (AMAD) decreased with increasing ambient 7Be concentrations. The mean residence times by using a mean growth rate of 0.004 μm·h−1 were estimated to be 2.5–6.4 days. The AMAD has an increasing tendency with higher relative humidity. It seemed that the high humidity condition facilitated the growth of the aerosol, resulting in increased deposition rates of the aerosols and the low 7Be content in the surface air. The AMAD of the 7Be aerosols increased with an increasing temperature, but the temperature dependency of AMAD should be explained with geological and meteorological conditions.

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