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In the present study, efficiency of the artificial neural network (ANN) method to identify the best drought tolerance indices was investigated. For this purpose, 25 durum genotypes were evaluated under rainfed and supplemental irrigation environments during two consecutive cropping seasons (2011–2013). The results of combined analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed that year, environment, genotype and their interaction effects were significant for grain yield. Mean grain yield of the genotypes ranged from 184.93 g plot–1 under rainfed environment to 659.32 g plot–1 under irrigated environment. Based on the ANN results, yield stability index (YSI), harmonic mean (HM) and stress susceptible index (SSI) were identified as the best indices to predict drought-tolerant genotypes. However, mean productivity (MP) followed by geometric mean productivity (GMP) and HM were found to be accurate indices for screening drought tolerant genotypes. In general, our results indicated that genotypes G9, G12, G21, G23 and G24 were identified as more desirable genotypes for cultivation in drought-prone environments. Importantly, these results could provide an evidence that ANN method can play an important role in the selection of drought tolerant genotypes and also could be useful in other biological contexts.

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Pepó P. — Győri Z.: 2005. A study of the yield stability of winter wheat varieties — Cereal research communications vol. 33 no. 4 769–776 pp. Győri Z. A study of the yield stability

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54 65 77 Pepó P. — Győri Z.: 2005. A Study of the Yield Stability of Winter Wheat Varieties. Cereal Research Communications 33,4: 769

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4 129 133 Pepó, Péter, Győri, Z. (2005): A Study of the Yield Stability of Winter Wheat Varieties — Cereal Research Communications, Vol. 33 No. 4

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Abd El Moneim, M. A., Cocks, P. S., Swedan, Y. 1988: Yield stability of selected forage vetches ( Vicia sp.) under rainfed conditions in West Asia. Journal of Agricultural Science (Cambridge) , 111 , 295

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, P., Győri, Z.: 2005. A Study of the Yield Stability of Winter Wheat Varieties — Cereal Research Communications, vol. 33 no. 4 pp. 769–772. Győri Z. A Study of the Yield Stability

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.B., Zimmermann, M.J. 1995. Correlation among yield stability parameters in common bean. Crop Sci. 35 :905–912. Zimmermann M.J. Correlation among yield stability parameters in common bean

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stability of promising lines of winter and facultative wheat in different climates of Iran. Afr. J. Agric. Res. 7 : 2304–2311. Hamlabad H.B. Yield stability of promising lines of winter

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. : 2007 . Effect of maize stalks and N fertilisation on the yield and yield stability of maize ( Zea mays L.) grown in a monoculture in a long-term experiment . Cereal Res. Commun . 35 : 249 – 252 . 6

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Cereal Research Communications
Authors: B.L. Béres, N.Z. Lupwayi, F.J. Larney, B. Ellert, E.G. Smith, T.K. Turkington, D. Pageau, K. Semagn, and Z. Wang

Research indicates that not all crops respond similarly to cropping diversity and the response of triticale (× Triticosecale ssp.) has not been documented. We investigated the effects of rotational diversity on cereals in cropping sequences with canola (Brassica napus L.), field pea (Pisum sativum L.), or an intercrop (triticale:field pea). Six crop rotations were established consisting of two, 2-yr low diversity rotations (LDR) (continuous triticale (T-T_LDR) and triticale-wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) (T-W_LDR)); three, 2-yr moderate diversity rotations (MDR) (triticale-field pea (T-P_MDR), triticale-canola (T-C_MDR), and a triticale: field pea intercrop (T- in P_MDR)); and one, 3-yr high diversity rotation (HDR) (canola-triticale-field pea (C-T-P_HDR)). The study was established in Lethbridge, Alberta (irrigated and rainfed); Swift Current (rainfed) and Canora (rainfed), Saskatchewan, Canada; and carried out from 2008 to 2014. Triticale grain yield for the 3-yr HDR was superior over the LDR rotations and the MDR triticale-field pea system; however, results were similar for triticale-canola, and removal of canola from the system caused a yield drag in triticale. Triticale biomass was superior for the 3-yr HDR. Moreover, along with improved triticale grain yield, the 3-yr HDR provided greater yield stability across environments. High rotational diversity (C-T-P_HDR) resulted in the highest soil microbial community and soil carbon concentration, whereas continuous triticale provided the lowest. Net economic returns were also superior for C-T-P_HDR ($670 ha–1) and the lowest for T-W_LDR ($458 ha–1). Overall, triticale responded positively to increased rotational diversity and displayed greater stability with the inclusion of field pea, leading to improved profitability and sustainability of the system.

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