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co-authorship network is explained from the perspective of Triple Helix. Taken together, this study examines how the network of scientific collaboration between ‘advanced’ countries is shaped and how the international knowledge network has changed

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Scientometrics
Authors:
Hildrun Kretschmer
,
Ramesh Kundra
,
Donald deB. Beaver
, and
Theo Kretschmer

determining factor in shaping preferences in co-authorship between individual scientists . This principle is based on similarities/dissimilarities and the corresponding consideration of this and other complementarities are a crucial determinant of the

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aggregate Africa's scientific output at the city and country levels, and by utilizing social network visualization techniques we propose a picture of the regionalization of African science based on co-authorship links, resulting in a regional template

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Abstract  

This paper studies the structure of collaboration in the Journal of Finance for the period 1980–2009 using publication data from the Social Sciences Citation Index (SSCI). There are 3,840 publications within this period, out of which 58% are collaborations. These collaborations form 405 components, with the giant component capturing approximately 54% of total coauthors (it is estimated that the upper limit of distinct JF coauthors is 2,536, obtained from the total number of distinct author keywords found within the study period). In comparison, the second largest component has only 13 members. The giant component has mean degree 3 and average distance 8.2. It exhibits power-law scaling with exponent α = 3.5 for vertices with degree ≥5. Based on the giant component, the degree, closeness and betweenness centralization score, as well as the hubs/authorities score is determined. The findings indicate that the most important vertex on the giant component coincides with Sheridan Titman based on his top ten ranking on all four scores.

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phenomenon can be measured by co-authorship of published papers. According to Kostoff's study, in terms of research articles, especially in cutting-edge technologies, such as nanotechnology and energetic materials, China has grown significantly and is among

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Abstract  

As scientific collaboration is a phenomenon that is becoming increasingly important, studies on scientific collaboration are numerous. Despite the proliferation of studies on various dimensions of collaboration, there is still a dearth of analyses on the effects, motives and modes of collaboration in the context of developing countries. Adopting Wallerstein’s world-system theory, this paper makes use of bibliometric data in an attempt to understand the pattern of collaboration that emerges between South Africa and Germany. The key argument is that we can expect the collaborative relationship between South Africa and Germany to be one that is shaped by a centre–periphery pattern. The analyses show that a theory of scientific collaboration building on the notion of marginality and centre–periphery can explain many facets of South African–German collaboration, where South Africa is a semi-peripheral region, a centre for the periphery, and a periphery for the centre.

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Abstract  

Co-authored publications across sectors have been used as indicators of the triple helix model and more generally for the study of science–technology relations. However, how to measure the relationships among the three or more sectors is a technically difficult issue. Using mutual information as an indicator has proved to be effective, but it is not widely used. In this paper, we introduced φ coefficients and partial correlation as conventional indicators to measure the relationships among sectors on the basis of Japanese publication data in the ISI-databases. We also proposed a new approach of graphical modeling based on partial correlation for studying university–industry–government relationships and relationships with other sectors. The conventional indicators give results that are consistent with mutual information, which shows that collaborations among the three national sectors (U, I, G) are getting weaker and that members of these sectors tend to collaborate much more with foreign researchers. It is also shown that universities used to play the central role in the national publication system and acted as a bridge between national sectors and foreign researchers. However, since 2000, the situation has been changing. The center of the Japanese research network is becoming more “foreign” oriented.

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between research performance of a scientist, measured by the bibliometric method, and the degree of internationalization of his or her scientific activity, using co-authorship of scientific publications with foreign authors as a proxy of international

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network whilst considering researcher mobility is yet to be conducted. Sectoral approaches also serve as important methods for understanding how scientific collaboration enhances research activities. Detailed co-authorship analysis focusing on

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2008. This placed China fourth in the US list of countries ranked by international co-authorship, up from 13th in 1998 (National Science Board 2010 , Appendix Tables 5-40 and 5-41). The relationship between the US and China is of worldwide

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