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At first glance, indeed, it becomes immediately apparent that the whole text is written in Latin letters, and some expressions are clearly constructed in accordance with the rules of Latin grammar, but in some other elements, undeniable Greek

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A travers l’étude des chartes, il est possible de mettre en évidence de nombreux changements linguistiques en cours dans le latin mérovingien. Cet article se base sur un corpus de 213 chartes conservées dans les archives de Saint-Denis-en-France et

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The presented paper deals with the private life of Romans, as described on Latin funerary inscriptions. It focuses on people of humble origin of the city of Rome, their names, occupations and individual life stories.

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The present study examines the role classical Latin authors played in the beginnings of Latin literacy in medieval Hungary - from the point of view of the history of libraries. It focuses on four sources: a letter of Bishop Fulbert of Chartres to Bishop Bonipert of Pécs, the Institutio of King Saint Stephen of Hungary, the Deliberatio of Bishop Saint Gerard of Csanád, and the book list of the Benedictine abbey of Pannonhalma.

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hippokratischen Forschers aer. 24. 10 nachzuahmen – auf dem guten Weg. * Einen ganz herzlichen Dank schulde ich Oswald Panagl, der das Deutsche des vorliegenden Beitrags einer kritischen Durchsicht unterzogen hat. 1 VÄÄNÄNEN, V.: Le latin vulgaire des

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The present paper aims at examining the phonetic characteristics of the Latin in Narbonensis as reflected by the local inscriptions. Data will be presented from a limited corpus: from Fréjus (Forum Iulii), Antibes (Antipolis), Riez (Reii Apollinares), Digne (Dinia), Aix-en-Provence (Aquae Sextiae), Apt (Apta Iulia), Vienne (Vienna) and their territories. The inscriptions from these areas have been republished recently with the addition of some newly discovered inscriptions. Thus, this epigraphic material needs reconsideration in order to see whether the data collected from the new annotated edition corroborate or refute the existing findings of Vulgar Latin research.

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In his Latin translation of Plato's Letter VII 326b-c Leonardo Bruni used the already existing translation of the passage made by Cicero. The paper shows how the Florentine humanist treated the version of his master: he reproduced it with slight modifications caused by his desire for originality.

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This paper claims the Central European language reform movements in the late 18th century and in the mid-19th century showed a number of similarities with regard to both their aims and their methods. Their main characteristic feature was the endeavour to purify the mother tongue and to introduce new words for elements of foreign (primarily Greek or Latin) specialized terminologies belonging to general education or serving at least as skills needed for orientation. This was a fundamental dilemma: to use Latin as the language of international cultural and academic relations or to give preference to mother tongues spoken by only certain language communities. Do the mother-tongue terms hinder the contacts with the international scientific world? An interesting solution of this dilemma based on some common ideas can be found in the works of Czech, Hungarian, and Croatian language reformers.

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The aim of this study is to examine and describe the official language use of the Roman Empire under Justinian I, focusing on the choice between Greek and Latin, the two traditional official languages of the empire. Comparing the practice under Justinian with that of the ages before resp. after Diocletian's accession (284), the conclusion can be drawn that Justinian reformed the official language use on purpose, following the practice of the principate.

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From 1091 onwards the nomadic confederacy of the Cumans had played an eminent historical role in the Balkans. The present paper investigates the Cuman participation in the fight of Byzantium with the Latins, during and after the Fourth Crusade in 1204, and comes to the conclusion that the Cumans' historical role in the restoration of the Second Bulgarian Empire in 1185-1186 and in the following events of the upcoming two decades is undeniable. The Cumans had no strategic aims, their primary and short-time goal being robbery and pillage. Though their employment in campaigns and battles as mercenaries was of prime importance for both the Vlakho-Bulgarians and the Byzantines and the Latins, they did not present a real long-term menace to the statehood of either of the waring factions.

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