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Abstract  

The validity of the Roy approximation for citation counting is critically evaluated.

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Abstract  

It is argued that Leydesdorff's theory of citations mixes the ideal or pure case with complicating factors. Ideally, citations are used as shorthand and for ethical reasons. The social network between scientists should be seen as a second-order correction on the basic model or, sometimes, even as noise. Metaphorically speaking Leydesdorff's theory is not a theory about ideal gases, but about polluted air.

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Abstract

The h-index has received an enormous attention for being an indicator that measures the quality of researchers and organizations. We investigate to what degree authors can inflate their h-index through strategic self-citations with the help of a simulation. We extended Burrell's publication model with a procedure for placing self-citations, following three different strategies: random self-citation, recent self-citations and h-manipulating self-citations. The results show that authors can considerably inflate their h-index through self-citations. We propose the q-index as an indicator for how strategically an author has placed self-citations, and which serves as a tool to detect possible manipulation of the h-index. The results also show that the best strategy for an high h-index is publishing papers that are highly cited by others. The productivity has also a positive effect on the h-index.

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Abstract  

An article by article analysis produced by ISI has been investigated to see whether this form of feedback might be useful to the editors. The data highlight the different roles of two medical journals, which are often regarded as similar. They also allow a parallel examination of the citation pattern of other items besides the standard scientific research articles.

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. Leydesdorff , L. , Bornmann , L. , Mutz , R. , & Opthof , T. ( 2011 ). Turning the tables in citation analysis one more time: Principles for comparing sets of documents . Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology , 62

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values of citations (analysis of the CIHPM) Citations Citation impact

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University Press New York . Park , HW , Leydesdorff , L 2009 Knowledge linkage structures in communication studies using citation analysis among communication journals . Scientometrics 81 1 157 – 175 10

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Abstract  

Up to the 1960s the prevalent view of science was that it was a step-by-step undertaking in slow, piecemeal progression towards truth. Thomas Kuhn argued against this view and claimed that science always follows this pattern: after a phase of “normal” science, a scientific “revolution” occurs. Taking as a case study the transition from the static view of the universe to the Big Bang theory in cosmology, we appraised Kuhn’s theoretical approach by conducting a historical reconstruction and a citation analysis. As the results show, the transition in cosmology can be linked to many different persons, publications, and points in time. The findings indicate that there was not one (short term) scientific revolution in cosmology but instead a paradigm shift that progressed as a slow, piecemeal process.

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studies utilize bibliometric techniques, with an emphasis on citation analysis. The argument is that if science is created through scholarly writing, then we can identify documents as the carriers of disciplinary understanding and structure and see

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