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disciplines), the introduction of confidence intervals, and the rounding of reported indices to a more appropriate number of digits” (Vanclay 2012 ). Or, second and preferably, Thomson Reuters abandons citation analysis altogether in favor of a “gate

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Abstract  

The study seeks to identify the influence of local and regional publications in the production of public health research papers in the Latin American region. A citation analysis of the papers published in the following three leading journals in the field of public health was conducted: Revista Médica de Chile (Chile) (RMCh); Archivos Latinoamericanos de Nutrición (Venezuela) (ALAN); and Salud Pública de México (México) (SPM). Papers were analyzed for the period 2003–2007. SciELO (Scientific Electronic Library Online) and the printed version of the journals were used in the analysis. Overall, 1,273 papers from 122 journal issues were analyzed. References accounted for a total of 38,459. Over 90% of the production was published through the collaboration of two or more authors. Author affiliation corresponded in most cases to the country of origin of the journal. References to Portuguese papers accounted for nearly 5% in ALAN and less than 1% each in SPM and RMCh. Citations among the three journals were not significant. Only ALAN cited RMCh and SPM over 3% each, of total citations. SPM and RMCh cited each other less than 1% of total citations. With the exception of ALAN, most public health papers published in RMCh and SPM derived from the national collaboration of researchers in the field. A small amount of public health knowledge communication was being transferred from Brazil to the region through RMCh and SPM. A vertical and individual (per journal/country) model of knowledge communication in public health was identified.

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counting the publications, an attempt was also made to gauge the scientific influence using the standard techniques of citation analysis. Since a reliable estimate of citation impact requires a certain time (at least a few years) after publication, papers

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impact of scholarly contributions between IS and other COB disciplines. We apply and extend field co-citation analysis (Sugimoto et al. 2008 ) using COB fields. Discipline-defining journal sets were used as proxies of the COB disciplines. We describe the

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A detailed quantitative, citation study is made on the concepts of Bell, Machlup, and Drucker related to the economic and social effects of the growth of information-based industries.

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This research analyzes a “who cites whom” matrix in terms of aggregated journal-journal citations to determine the location of communication studies on the academic spectrum. Using the Journal of Communication as the seed journal, the 2006 data in the Journal Citation Reports are used to map communication studies. The results show that social and experimental psychology journals are the most frequently used sources of information in this field. In addition, several journals devoted to the use and effects of media and advertising are weakly integrated into the larger communication research community, whereas communication studies are dominated by American journals.

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The present paper focuses on some important requirements for understanding patent searchreports in view of their use for statistical analysis. It is pointed out and illustrated that thecomprehensiveness and the quality of a given search report may vary significantly as a function ofthe patent office drawing up the report. These differences imply consequences with respect to thesafe use and interpretation of the data. The authors stress that a sound analysis based on patentcitation data can only be performed in a meaningful way if the analyst has a minimum knowledgeof the underlying search reports.

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This paper discusses the publications of Third World Countries (TWC) in theScience Citation Index by disciplines. TWC documents which were nationally cross-linked at least 20 times were identified and their citing documents categorised into seven disciplines. The top 12 TWC are discussed vis--vis their population, Gross National Product, and the extent of participation usingobserved rates of contribution in each discipline andexpected rates based on numbers of citations received. Brazil, Mexico, Argentina and Chile, appeared most frequently in the top five ranks in each of the seven disciplines; however, none of these countries had neither the largest population nor the highest GNP per capita. Overall observed rates exceeded expected rates in all but two disciplines: Biomedicine and Agriculture. Physics & Engineering had the highest overall observed rate with the top five TWC exceeding the overall and their individual expected rates. Brazil and Venezuela led by exceeding their expected rates in four of the seven disciplines.

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Abstract  

The objective of this study is to use a clustering algorithm based on journal cross-citation to validate and to improve the journal-based subject classification schemes. The cognitive structure based on the clustering is visualized by the journal cross-citation network and three kinds of representative journals in each cluster among the communication network have been detected and analyzed. As an existing reference system the 15-field subject classification by Glänzel and Schubert (Scientometrics 56:55–73, <cite>2003</cite>) has been compared with the clustering structure.

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