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The book of Latin stylistics Syntaxis ornata seu de tribus Latinae linguae virtutibus (1754) deals with the three virtues of Latin — purity, refinement and richness. The attention is focused on the issues of word and sentence purity on the background of the vernacular languages of Hungary in the 18th century. The author emphasizes how to avoid lexical and syntactical barbarisms and solecisms. This paper presents the most frequent mistakes made in Latin bases on the extensive lists in the book, which also allow the investigation of the analogies and differences between classical and neo-Latin syntactic structures. Principally, these occur in the predominant use of the conjunction quod instead of ut and of infinitive forms. The grammar book is also significant from the perspective of modern philology, as it also observes the progress and reciprocal influence of the domestic — German, Hungarian and Slovak — vocabularies.

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This study presents some of the most important phonological and grammatical phenomena which show the evolution of Late Latin in the Roman province of Britannia. The investigation is based on a corpus of inscriptions on stone (established by Collingwood and Wright). The Vulgar Latin of Britannia seems not very different from that of other provinces, but the progression of certain changes is slower. The author insists on the different origins of soldiers and colonists who took part in the romanization of the island.

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Tres bybliothecas habeo, unam Graecam, alteram Latinam

Textkritische, philologische und soziolinguistische Interpretation von Petrons Satyricon 48. 4.

Acta Antiqua Academiae Scientiarum Hungaricae
Author:
Béla Adamik

The aim of this study is to examine a sentence from Petron's Satyricon usually considered tobe problematic and corrupted (48, 4): tres bybliothecas habeo, unam Graecam, alteram Latinam. However, we demonstrate that the old conjecture proposed for healing that sentence, i.e. duas for tres, is untenable and in fact grammatically impossible and so the reading of the Codex Traguriensis is correct. Afterwards we explain the meaning of this sentence in accordance with those interpreters who explain Trimalchio's silence on his own third library with a kind of inferiority complex in the given situation activated by the sociolinguistic pressure motivated by the hegemonic Graeco-Latin bilingualism in the Roman World.

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In his study on the Vulgar Latin of Pompeian inscriptions, Väänänen dealt with the problem of the dropping of final - m in a peculiar way. 1 He grouped the omissions of final - m in three categories as follows: a) cases where the omission of - m

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Ornas (also Hornach) appears in the mentions of several Latin authors in the mid-thirteenth century as an important city deep in Asia that had been conquered by the Mongols. There have been several past suggestions by scholars for its identity; the scattered mentions of Ornas (Hornach) have been variously suggested to refer to Tana, Otrar, or Konye-Urgench. The present paper argues that these references, though confused on matters of geography since the Western European authors were writing about largely unknown regions that they did not personally visit, are typically references to the city of Konye-Urgench. The Latin authors’ descriptions of its fall to the Mongols unquestionably draw parallels with Middle Eastern, Rus’, Chinese, and Mongol accounts. This paper argues that the Latin references to Ornas’ proximity to a nearby sea are related to the Aral Sea which had southerly stretches very close to Konya-Urgench as is indicated, for instance from Russian survey maps of the nineteenth century. This identification allows us to place John of Plano Carpini’s description of the fall of Ornas within a larger, cohesive narrative which, though confused on points, offers insights on the fall of the Khwarazmian Empire in the early 1220s.

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A lead tablet recently discovered in the eastern cemetery of the Aquincum civil town is of much interest. The tablet which can be dated on archaeological grounds to the late 2nd-early 3rd centuries AD seems to be a binding curse of a group of men against another group, written in Latin. This curse tablet is especially significant because only five more Latin curses had previously been found in the territory of Roman Pannonia and it supports the inferences that can be deducted from this small collection.

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The aim of this study is to demonstrate what kind of changes took place in the Latin language in Aquitaine according to the inscriptions. All of the relevant inscriptions were examined up to this time, so we can form an opinion on the remarks made by József Herman, who was the first to deal with the development of the Latin of the Three Gauls in detail and who intended to write the history of this language. The categories of the computerized database are used for the analysis of the changes and some examples for the changes found are mentioned.

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„VITIUM AFRORUM FAMILIARE”?

A latin magánhangzók kvantitásrendszerének átépülése Afrikában és Rómában a metrikus feliratok tanúsága szerint

Antik Tanulmányok
Author:
NÓRA PAULUS

* * Jelen tanulmány a Császárkori latin feliratok számítógépes nyelvtörténeti adatbázisa (NKFIH K124170 2018–2021) című projekt keretében, az MTA Lendület Számítógépes Latin Dialektológiai Kutatócsoportban készült. A kutatást az Emberi Erőforrások

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The opinion of traditional grammars and the hypothetical derived PIE form is inconsistent as concerns the quantity of the sing. nominative-accusative ending of Latin u-stem neuters. Since the received scholarly opinion holds that the quantity cannot be determinated from the available sources, certain scholars have stated that the ending is a short -u. A comprehensive re-examination of the ancient grammatical opinion and the relevant metrical texts demonstrates that on the basis of two passages, namely Aen. XI 859 and nux 106, the truth of the traditional view, i.e., that the sing. nom.-acc. of u-stem neuters is long, can be confirmed.

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In the present paper, the Latin source of the Marian Sermons written by Jan of Szamotuły (c. 1480–1519) is identified and discussed. The collection of Sermons, survived in a manuscript dated to the early 16th century, consists of a number of texts concerning the Immaculate Conception, the Nativity, the Holy Name, and the Life of the Blessed Virgin Mary. Although closely related to medieval scholastic treatises in their structure and theological content, the Sermons were generally believed to be Jan of Szamotuły’s own work. However, the author of this paper argues that the actual source of this collection was a volume of sermons Stellarium coronae Benedictae Mariae Virginis written by the Hungarian Franciscan Pelbárt of Temesvár (c. 1435–1504). The two texts are compared with a view of identifying the characteristic features of the Polish translation. The paper also discusses some issues concerning the date and circumstances of the creation of the collection of Sermons.

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