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minority of the 2010-11 amendments belonged to this group. The subject matters of the ‘demolishing’ amendments were as follows: nomination of Constitutional Court judges, 37 freedom of press – creating a constitutional basis for a new media legislation

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EU institutions, NGOs included) that protects the rights of LGBTQ communities or immigrants, alternative churches or other minorities that do not represent the majority interest. 32 Anti-institutionalism, anti-pluralism, and anti-liberalism are the

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EU institutions, NGOs included) that protects the rights of LGBTQ communities or immigrants, alternative churches or other minorities that do not represent the majority interest. 32 Anti-institutionalism, anti-pluralism, and anti-liberalism are the

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of competence, an administrative organizational principle. {Decision 18/2013. (VII. 3.) AB, Minority Report [20]} In my opinion, it would have been more appropriate to regulate the principle of local self-governance, so it could take the sting out of

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.1080/10852352.2016.1198157 Green , L. ( 1982 ). Minority students’ self-control of procrastination . Journal of Counseling Psychology , 29 ( 6 ), 636 – 644 . doi: 10.1037/0022-0167.29.6.636 Gross

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. , Gatt , S. , & Racionero , S. ( 2011 ). Placing immigrant and minority family and community members at the school’s centre: The role of community participation . European Journal of Education , 46 ( 2 ), 184 – 196 . doi: 10.1111/j.1465

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. W. ( 2006 ). Migrationshintergrund, Minderheitenzugehörigkeit und Bildungserfolg. Forschungsergebnisse der pädagogischen, Entwicklungs- und Sozialpsychologie [Migrant background, minority affiliation and educational success. Research results of pedagogical

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-making technique for expressing the intensity of preferences by minority groups about certain issues and not about setting up a decision making organ. It would probably also mean – as a conceptual side-effect – that everybody should have the possibility not to go

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The paper analyzes ethnic data collection pertaining to criminal justice in Hungary. It shows that Hungary's approach to resist ethnic data collection by law enforcement authorities is not a good policy and it causes severe constitutional problems in other, non-criminal legal circumstances, where ethnic data is used in the context of additional rights and affirmative protection provided for ethno-national minorities. The paper follows a twofold analysis. First, it sets forth general problems relating to ethnic data collection, including a brief analysis of a uniquely Hungarian constitutional institution, the minority self-govern­ment structure. The focus of scrutiny then shifts to the criminal justice system, in particular the analysis of policing of racially motivated crime, and the question of police ethnic profiling.    

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Treating people as equals is one of the main aims of constitutional democracies. Numerous examples prove the adverse effects if a state violates the equality principles relating to ethnic minorities and religious groups. Here is a lesson from Hungary. The Hungarian Constitutional Court (hereinafter: HCC) is not engaged in adjudicating concrete ‘cases and controversies’, but seemingly reviews the constitutionality of laws. The Constitution lays down the fundamental tenets relating to religious groups, churches, ethnic minorities and the principles of equality in general. Thus, the question is how the problems of religions and minorities are reflected in the constitutional case-law.The main theses of this article are following. First, based on historical facts the HCC provides preferential treatment for so-called historical churches. Second, in cases involving Roma the HCC does not consider the historical facts and social reality thus, the discrimination of Roma does not appear in the jurisprudence. Third, the unequal protection of churches and Roma by the state results in advantages being provided where the constitutional reasons of preferential treatment are absent while the state remains inactive where the promotion of the principles of equality would be most necessary.

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