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Alemayehu, F., 1995 . Genetic variation between and within Ethiopian barley landraces with emphasis on durable resistance. Thesis, land-bouw Universiteit Wageningen. The Netherlands. Alemayehu F

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. FAO, 2005: FAOSTAT data, http://faostat.fao.org Last updated February 2005 Kőszegi, Kovács (2004): Investigations on the plant structure characteristics of emmer landraces under inhomogeneous conditions, Acta

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Cereal Research Communications
Authors: Hongxiang M, Jinbao Yao, Miaoping Zhou, Xu Zhang, Lijuan Ren, Giuhong Yu, and Weizhong Lu

Wheat Fusarium head blight (FHB) may cause serious losses in grain yield and quality in China. More than 7 million hectares which approximately accounts for 25% of the total areas in China is infected by the disease. The cultivation of wheat varieties with resistance to Fusarium head blight is recognized as one of the most important components to diminish losses due to this disease. Chinese wheat breeders have commenced the research on FHB since 1950s. Wheat cultivars with improved FHB resistance were developed through conventional breeding. Some famous resistant varieties such as Sumai 3, Yangmai 158 and Ning 7840 were released from Jiangsu Academy of Agricultural Sciences, these varieties were widely applied in wheat production and breeding programs. Significant achievements concerning molecular mapping and marker assisted selection have been made in the past decade. The major QTL on chromosome 3BS was identified and located in the same region on chromosome 3BS in Sumai 3, Ning 894037, Wangshuibai, and Chinese Spring. Using SSR marker in this QTL region for assisted selection, some lines with the same resistance to FHB were obtained. New STS markers and SSCP markers were developed and will be tested for the efficiency of MAS. However, further achievements are still hindered by a number of constraints. More FHB resistance genetic resources from landrace in middle to lower reaches of Yangtze River are necessary to be used for improving FHB resistant. The genetic mechanism of the varieties contributing the resistance to improved cultivars is needed to be understood. Development of functional markers for FHB is discussed.

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Acta Alimentaria
Authors: A. Lugasi, K. Neszlényi, J. Hóvári, K. V. Lebovics, A. Hermán, T. Ács, J. Gundel, and I. Bodó

Fat content and fatty acid composition were investigated in Musculus gluteus medius of pigs from two different breeds: traditional Hungarian Mangalica and a crossbreed of Hungarian Large White and Dutch Landrace. Animals of both varieties were divided into two groups and were kept individually on control or experimental mixtures of feeds. Experimental feed contained significantly higher amount of linoleic and linolenic acid than the control one. Significantly higher fat content was detected in meat of Mangalica pigs kept on both feed mixtures than in those of crossbred. The proportion of saturated fatty acids was nearly the same in the meat of both genotypes. More monounsaturated fatty acids were detected in Mangalica meat than in crossbred ones expressed in percent of total fatty acids and absolute amount, as well. As a result of experimental diet, percentage and absolute amount of oleic acid decreased significantly in both genotypes. Less polyunsaturated fatty acids expressed as percent of total acids were observed in the muscle of Mangalica than in those of crossbred ones. Absolute amount and the proportion of total polyunsaturated fatty acids (especially linoleic and linolenic acids) increased significantly as a result experimental diets. The ratio of n-6 and n-3 fatty acids changed beneficially in both genotypes consuming a diet containing 20% full-fat soy from 13.6:1 to 10.0:1 in Mangalica and from 15.4:1 to 10.3:1 in crossbred genotype. According to present results, it has became clear that the fatty acid composition of the meat of the traditional Hungarian Mangalica can be successfully modified by the diet, and this manipulation can make the meat healthier in spite of its high fat content.

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Bucheyekei, T.L., Gwanama, C., Mgonja, M., Chisi, M., Folkertsma, R., Mutegi, R. 2009. Genetic variability characterisation of Tanzania sorghum landraces based on Simple Sequence Repeats (SSR) molecular and morphological markers. Afr. J. Crop Sci. 17 :71

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Davood, A., Ashkboos, F., Sadeghi, M., Bahram, D.N. 2004. Evaluation of salinity tolerance in landrace wheat germplasms of Cereals Research Collection Department. Isfahan Agricultural and Natural Resources Research Center Publisher, Isfahan, Iran, 14 pp

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Acta Agronomica Hungarica
Authors: M. Hudcovicová, V. Šudyová, S. Šliková, E. Gregová, J. Kraic, F. Ordon, D. Mihálik, V. Horevaj, and Z. Šramková

Gregová, E., Hermuth, J., Kraic, J., Dotlačil, L. (1999): Protein heterogeneity in European wheat landraces and obsolete cultivars. Genetic Resources and Crop Evolution , 46 , 521–528. Dotlačil L

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Ahmed, I. 2004. Genetic Diversity for Agro-morphological and High Molecular Weight Glutenin Subunits in Wheat ( Triticum aestivum L.) Landraces. PhD dissertation. University of Arid Agriculture, Rawalpindi

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Kőszegi, B., Kovács, G. (2003): Gradient chamber studies on the dry matter accumulation of winter emmer [ Triticum turgidum ssp. dicoccon (Schrank) Thell.] landraces in the seedling stage. Acta Agron. Hung. , 51 , 413

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2002 Stelmakh, A.F. 1990. Geographic distribution of Vrn genes in landraces and improved varieties of spring bread wheat. Euphytica 45 :113

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