Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 139 items for :

  • " Campylobacter " x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All
European Journal of Microbiology and Immunology
Authors: Rogier Louwen, P. van Baarlen, A. H. M. van Vliet, A. van Belkum, J. P. Hays, and H. P. Endtz

cases of human Vibrio sis Ann NY Acad Sci 98 700 – 711 . 7. Smibert , RM ( 1974 ): Campylobacter . In: Bergey's Manual of

Restricted access

Ailes, E., Demma, L., Hurd, S., Hatch, J., Jones, T. et al.: Continued decline in the incidence of Campylobacter infections, FoodNet 1996–2006. Foodborne Pathog. and Dis. 5 (3), 329–337 (2008

Restricted access

W. van Pelt J.A. Wagenaar R.J. Owen 2008 Host-pathogen interactions in Campylobacter

Restricted access

) 11. Leung FY , Littlejohn GO , Bombardier C : Reiter’s syndrome after Campylobacter jejuni enteritis . Arthritis Rheum 23 , 948 – 950 ( 1980

Open access

. , Dingle , K. E. , Dawkins , M. S. and Maiden , M. C. ( 2008 ): Campylobacter infection of broiler chickens in a freerange environment . Environ. Microbiol. 10 , 2042 – 2050

Open access
European Journal of Microbiology and Immunology
Authors: Wycliffe Omurwa Masanta, Raimond Lugert, Uwe Groß, Gunter Linsel, Astrid Heutelbeck, and Andreas Erich Zautner

, Gross U : Campylobacter jejuni: a brief overview on pathogenicityassociated factors and disease-mediating mechanisms . Int J Med Microbiol 300 , 205 – 211 ( 2010 ) 5

Open access

. ( 2011 ): From farm to fork follow-up of thermotolerant campylobacters throughout the broiler production chain and in human cases in a Hungarian county during a ten-months period . Int. J. Food Microbiol. , 150 , 95 – 102

Open access

The association between putative virulence genes in Campylobacter jejuni clinical isolates, in vitro invasive capability and severity of infection is yet to be clearly described. We have characterized three virulence genes and correlated their presence with the severity of infection and in vitro invasiveness. We studied eight C. jejuni strains isolated from patients whose clinical data were scored to determine severity of infection. Cytolethal distending toxin (cdtB) , invasion associated marker (iam) and Campylobacter invasion antigen (ciaB) genes were detected by PCR and INT407 cells used for invasion assays. Two strains positive for all three genes were the most invasive and isolated from patients with the most severe infection. Four strains positive for two genes and two strains negative for all the three genes were identified. The two cdtB + ve / ciaB + ve strains were more invasive than the cdtB + ve / iam + ve strains. One of the cdtB ve / ciaB ve strains showed invasion levels similar to cdtB + ve / ciaB + ve strains, but the second strain had a non-invasive phenotype. The findings indicate a correlation between in vitro invasive capability, and the presence of all three genes. The pattern of association between invasiveness and molecular characterization suggests that the ciaB gene confers a more invasive capability.

Restricted access
European Journal of Microbiology and Immunology
Authors: Andreas E. Zautner, A. Malik Tareen, U. Groß, and R. Lugert

References 1. J.P. Butzler 2004 Campylobacter , from obscurity to celebrity Clin

Restricted access