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therapy. Then, if there is no need to pay attention to its safety while taking CUR or if there is any clause that we have to follow when it comes to drug combination? Bacillus subtilis ( B. subtilis ), which is commonly found in soil and

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The main purpose of this study was to determine optimum conditions for culture of a test microbe Bacillus subtilis (ATCC 6633) which enabled us to establish its use for direct bioautography. The viability of the bacteria on TLC plates was measured on the basis of their adenosine-5′-triphosphate (ATP) content as determined by bioluminescent luciferin/luciferase assay, the data being referred to values for total bacterial protein. In the first experiments, we used a ‘20-h’ culture of B. subtilis prepared by dilution of an optical density ( OD ) ≫ 0.4 culture to furnish a culture of OD = 0.4 (Method A). Later, on the basis of our optimization experiments we found that a ‘5–9-h’ broth culture of B. subtilis was suitable. Under these conditions the bacteria remained in the log phase ( OD = 0.2–0.4) for 5–9 h (Method B) in immersion bacterial suspension. Because the test bacteria were in the log phase a much shorter incubation time (4–8 h) was sufficient for TLC plates instead of the original 18 h in a previous study. One advantage of this method, in addition to the shorter incubation time, is that we can use TLC plates coated with adsorbents other than silica.

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Abstract  

Volatilization of polonium by microorganisms, Chromobacterium violaceum, Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis was examined for pure cultures in LB medium at 30 °C, showing relative Po emission intensity 100, 10 and 1, respectively. Chromobacterium violaceum pre-cultured in LB medium without Po and suspended in water with Po showed high Po volatilization in spite of poor nutriment condition. Antibiotics inhibit volatilization of Po and cultivation at low temperature greatly reduced volatilization. The results strongly support the biological effects on Po volatilization.

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Abstract  

Fiber of Japanese food natto (Bacillus subtilis) is known to be superabsorbent poly(-glutamic acid) (PGA). NaCl particles precipitate in FeCl2-absorbed crosslinked PGA when heated at crystallization temperature of 320 °C for 10 to 60 min. After heat treatment the Mössbauer spectrum of FeCl2-crosslinked PGA consists of a quadrupole doublet due to FeCl2·2H2O. The Mössbauer spectrum of anhydrous FeCl2 reagent heated under the same condition shows an intense sextet due to -Fe2O3 . These results prove that the superabsorbent polymer, crosslinked PGA, has higher heat resistance.

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Direct bioautography performed with luminescence gene-tagged bacteria enables almost real-time detection of antimicrobial compounds in plant extracts. This method for the detection of chamomile ( Matricaria recutita ) components with antibacterial effect against Bacillus subtilis soil bacteria was more sensitive than commonly used bioautographic visualization by staining with a tetrazolium salt. Some compounds had a strong inhibiting effect only via the bioluminescence measurement. Extraction of antibacterial components of chamomile flowers was most effective with 50% ethanol; slightly lower efficiency was achieved with acetone and methanol, and hexane was least effective. The results were confirmed by using luminescent Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola plant pathogen bacteria.

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The main volatile compounds from three medicinal plants belonging to Lamiaceae family were screened for their biological properties. The plants were Salvia officinalis, Thymus vulgaris, and Mentha × piperita containing as the main volatile constituents thujone, thymol, and menthol, respectively. The applied chromatographic system was silica gel developed with toluene-ethyl acetate (93:7). Thin-layer chromatography — direct bioautography (TLC-DB) against Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis was used for detection of antibacterial activity of the plant extracts and essential oils. The bioautographic fingerprints were compared with the fingerprints obtained after derivatization with anisaldehyde.

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Commercially available hop pellets of different origins were extracted by use of ethanol and water, chromatographed on silica layers by use of nonaqueous eluents, chemically derivatized and observed in ultraviolet (UV) light for the localization of component bands. The plates were developed in optimized systems, and direct bioautographic method by use of Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli strains was applied for the examination of the antimicrobial activities of hop components. The method enables for the identification of bactericidal/bacteriostatic components in the extracts of different polarities and shows differences in the composition of extracts from various varieties from an antimicrobial point of view.

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on this approach, the research study was applied to investigate the effect of different extracts on various pathogenic bacteria including Enterobacter cloacae , Micrococcus leutus , Aeromonas hydrophila , Bacillus subtilis , Bacillus cereus

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Thin-layer chromatography—direct bioautography (TLC—DB) followed by liquid chromatography—tandem mass spectrometry (LC—MS/MS) was used for screening and tentative identification of the antibacterial constituents of Salvia officinalis L. ethanol extract. Seven bacterial strains were used as test organisms, both pathogenic and nonpathogenic, that is, Staphylococcus aureus, methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), Staphylococcus epidermidis, Micrococcus luteus, Bacillus subtilis, luminescence gene-tagged Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola, and naturally luminescent marine bacterium Aliivibrio fischeri. Eight fractions with the widest antimicrobial spectrum were detected using TLC—DB, isolated by semi-preparative TLC, and subjected to LC—MS/MS analyses. Finally, five bioactive components were tentatively identified, based on their fragmentation pattern, such as salvigenin, cirsimaritin, rosmanol, carnosic acid, and 12-O-methyl carnosic acid.

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A method was developed for effect-directed analysis (EDA) of the root extract of Pimpinella saxifraga L. High-performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC) was hyphenated with microchemical, biochemical, and biological assays as well as electrospray ionization– mass spectrometry (ESI–MS). This HPTLC–UV/Vis/FLD– EDA–MS method directly pointed to multi-potent compounds in the P. saxifraga L. root extract. 2,2-Diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical scavengers, acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, estrogen-effective compounds, antimicrobials against Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis bacteria, and Gram-negative Aliivibrio fischeri bacteria were discovered in the root extract. A first targeted characterization of four unknown multi-potent compounds was performed by HPTLC–ESI–MS and microchemical derivatizations. This highly streamlined effect-directed profiling is recommended for a fast and cost-efficient natural product search.

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