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The large-scale archaeological excavations of the past years yielded a rapid increase of archaeological finds and observations. This large amount of new evidence enabled the observation of wider environmental archaeological relationships. In the study we reconstruct certain environmental and settlement pattern changes from the 13th to the 18th centuries based on archaeological data from the southern shore of Lake Balaton and the cities of the Danube Bend region. The settlements on the shore of Lake Balaton and along the Danube reacted similarly, but with a temporal lag. Hydroclimatic changes caused a shift in the location and structure of lake- and riverside settlements, which was of a horizontal character in the case of Lake Balaton, and of a vertical character in the case of the Danube Bend region.

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Archaeologiai Értesítő
Authors:
Gyöngyi Kovács
and
Márton Rózsás

The study analyses Ottoman clay tobacco pipes from the River Drava region (Barcs, Babócsa, Szigetvár). Some are stray finds, but many of those from Barcs are from the Ottoman palisaded stronghold there, from its Ottoman layer. The study fills a gap in the literature in that it presents hitherto unpublished pipe finds from this region. The goal of the research was to establish whether in addition to characteristics that were uniform countrywide, regional features, too, could be pointed out, and whether there were links between pieces which permitted the hypothesising of common workshops or trade routes. In the background of the similarities, waterborne trade conducted along the Drava and Danube rivers may be considered important, but other factors, too, may have had a role, e.g. various population movements and also redeployments of soldiers. In the light of the written data, Szigetvár had a workshop which produced clay tobacco pipes; kindred finds from the region can, perhaps, be brought into connection with this workshop.

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water of the Kapos River and its tributary the Koppány creek, creating an extensive marshland just adjacent to the presumable location of the grave. 41 The Tolna-Mözs site discovered between the Sárvíz creek and the Danube River follows the same pattern

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Dynamics of the Danube River in Žitný ostrov (Slovakia) from the Middle Ages). In: Kázmér M. (szerk.): Környezettörténet. Az utóbbi 500 év környezettörténeti eseményei történeti és természettudományos források tükrében. Budapest, 55

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, in which two nations, the Germans/Austrians and the Hungarians, enjoy a privileged status in comparison to the others – these discriminated others include the Serbs, of course, a significant part of whom lived north of the Sava and Danube rivers, in

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-term perspectives on river floods. The Dominican Nunnery on Margaret Island (Budapest) and the Danube River . Interdisciplinaria Archaeologica Online , IV ( 1 ): 73 – 82 . 1 Preliminary report on the excavation: P. Horváth (2020) . 2 About knives: P. Horváth

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Scythian king Ariapithes, was born to a Greek woman from the Greek city of Istria, near the mouth of the Ister (or Danube) River on the western coast of the Black Sea. This Scyles was taught to speak and read Greek by his mother. It came to pass that, when

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This paper broadly compares environmentalism in Hungary and Slovakia, with a specific focus on Slovakia’s green movement under late-socialism and after. Nature activism in both countries was not directly controlled by the Party, and in each case individuals pushed the boundaries of activism and redefined notions of protest and dissent. But the way these two movements emerged were quite different from one another. In Hungary, the movement coalesced around a big “international” Soviet-style mega-project. This was the flashpoint. In Hungary, the Nagymaros dam project was an infringement — a monument of unhappy partnerships, and a symbol that fueled nationalist rumblings. In Slovakia, the whole notion of megaworks was not an unwelcome idea. But the differences between Hungarian and Slovak greens are more than the story of a dam controversy. While Hungary’s movement had its origins in the Danube River, Slovak greens emerged from the conservation of folk dwellings in the mountains. In Slovakia — the weekend amateur, the Catholic, the writer, the sociologist — instead found traction in the notion of human conservation. I explore these differences and examine how things change in the post-socialist period.

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The investigation of ninth–eleventh century burials from Himod (NW Hungary)

Physical anthropology data in the light of artifact typology

Acta Archaeologica Academiae Scientiarum Hungaricae
Authors:
Piroska Rácz
and
Péter Langó

in Transdanubia, the western side of Hungary defined by the right bank of the Danube River. It should suffice to refer here to the much-discussed intepretation of the cemeteries at Győr-Téglavető-dűlő, 21 or mention the studies dealing with the Vörs

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Acta Archaeologica Academiae Scientiarum Hungaricae
Authors:
Beáta Tugya
,
Katalin Náfrádi
,
Sándor Gulyás
,
Tünde Törőcsik
,
Balázs Pál Sümegi
,
Péter Pomázi
, and
Pál Sümegi

significantly different from the current water network: the Tisza river flowed eastern than nowadays. The Danube River met the Tisza at the height of Csongrád. 15 According to the latest data 16 the Tisza valley was formed about 20,000 years ago. The Tisza

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