Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 13 items for :

  • "Diversity partitioning" x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All

In this paper, logarithmic functions are described based on which the total diversity of a collection can be partitioned into components specific to factorial effects. The standard statistical modus operandi of testing hypotheses in a factorial design is applied, only the test criteria changed. The factor identities are chosen according to stated hypothesis, observations are made and sorted, the associated entropy and information quantities are calculated, and probabilistic tests of significance are performed regarding main effects and interaction terms. The basics are presented in the main text. The partition functions, their Venn diagram mappings, and a complete printout from the application program DIVPART.EXE are collected in a separate Appendix accessible with this article on the publisher’s website.

Restricted access
Community Ecology
Authors: G. Bacaro, S. Maccherini, A. Chiarucci, A. Jentsch, D. Rocchini, D. Torri, M. Gioria, E. Tordoni, S. Martellos, A. Altobelli, R. Otto, C. G. Escudero, S. Fernández-Lugo, J. M. Fernández-Palacios, and J. R. Arévalo

Invasion by alien plant species may be rapid and aggressive, causing erosion of local biodiversity. This is particularly true for islands, where natural and anthropogenic corridors promote the rapid spread of invasive plants. Although evidence shows that corridors may facilitate plant invasions, the question of how their importance in the spread of alien species varies along environmental gradients deserves more attention. Here, we addressed this issue by examining diversity patterns (species richness of endemic, native and alien species) along and across roads, along an elevation gradient from sea-level up to 2050 m a.s.l. in Tenerife (Canary Islands, Spain), at multiple spatial scales. Species richness was assessed using a multi-scale sampling design consisting of 59 T-transects of 150 m × 2 m, along three major roads each placed over the whole elevation gradient. Each transect was composed of three sections of five plots each: Section 1 was located on the road edges, Section 2 at intermediate distance, and Section 3 far from the road edge, the latter representing the “native community” less affected by road-specific disturbance. The effect of elevation and distance from roadsides was evaluated for the three groups of species (endemic, native and alien species), using parametric and non-parametric regression analyses as well as additive diversity partitioning. Differences among roads explained the majority of the variation in alien species richness and composition. Patterns in alien species richness were also affected by elevation, with a decline in richness with increasing elevation and no alien species recorded at high elevations. Elevation was the most important factor determining patterns in endemic and native species. These findings confirm that climate filtering reflected in varying patterns along elevational gradients is an important determinant of the richness of alien species (which are not adapted to high elevations), while anthropogenic pressures may explain the richness of alien species at low elevation.

Restricted access

Alpha, beta, and gamma diversity are three fundamental biodiversity components in ecology, but most studies focus only on the scale issues of the alpha or gamma diversity component. The beta diversity component, which incorporates both alpha and gamma diversity components, is ideal for studying scale issues of diversity. We explore the scale dependency of beta diversity and scale relationship, both theoretically as well as by application to actual data sets. Our results showed that a power law exists for beta diversity-area (spatial grain or spatial extent) relationships, and that the parameters of the power law are dependent on the grain and extent for which the data are defined. Coarse grain size generates a steeper slope (scaling exponent z) with lower values of intercept (c), while a larger extent results in a reverse trend in both parameters. We also found that, for a given grain (with varying extent) or a given extent (with varying grain) the two parameters are themselves related by power laws. These findings are important because they are the first to simultaneously relate the various components of scale and diversity in a unified manner.

Restricted access

How are bryophyte alpha and beta diversities distributed across spatial scales along an elevational gradient in an oceanic island? Which mechanisms and drivers operate to shape them? Starting from a multiscale hierarchical sampling approach along an 1000 m elevational transect, we used additive diversity partitioning and null modeling to evaluate the contributions of the alpha and beta diversity components to overall bryophyte diversity in Terceira Island, Azores. Substrate-level diversity patterns were explored by means of the Sørensen Similarity Index and the Lloyd Index of Patchiness. Elevation-level beta diversity was decomposed into its replacement and richness differences components, with several environmental variables being evaluated as diversity predictors. Bryophyte diversity proved to be primarily due to beta diversity between elevation sites, followed by diversity among substrates. Compositional differences between neighboring sites decreased with elevation, being mainly caused by species replacement and correlating with differences in relative humidity and disturbance. At the substrate level, we found a great homogeneity in terms of species composition, coupled with a low substrate specialization rate. We conclude that, in Terceira’s native vegetation patches, regional processes, such as environmental gradients associated with elevation, play a greater role in shaping bryophyte diversity than local processes. Moister and less disturbed areas at mid-high elevation harbor a richer bryoflora, consistently more similar and stable between neighbouring sites. Simultaneously, the different substrates available are somewhat ecologically redundant, supporting few specialized species, pointing to these areas providing optimal habitat conditions for bryophytes. Our findings provide a better understanding of how bryophyte diversity is generated in Terceira Island, indicating that management and conservation measures should focus on island-level approaches, aiming to protect and rehabilitate additional natural vegetation patches at different elevations, especially in the severely disturbed lowlands.

Open access

72 367 382 Legendre, P., D. Borcard, and P.R. Peres-Neto. 2005. Analyzing beta diversity: partitioning the spatial variation of community

Restricted access

. Legendre , P. , D. Borcard and P.R. Peres-Neto . 2005 . Analyzing beta diversity: Partitioning the spatial variation of community composition data . Ecol. Monogr. 75 : 435 – 450

Restricted access
Community Ecology
Authors: J. Alahuhta, J. Rääpysjärvi, S. Hellsten, M. Kuoppala, and J. Aroviita

-Neto . 2005 . Analyzing beta diversity: partitioning the spatial variation of community composition data . Ecol. Monogr. 75 : 435 – 450 . Leibold , M.A. , M. Holyoak , N. Mouquet , P. Amarasekare , J

Restricted access

partitioning and beta-diversity analysis. J. Ecol. 95: 294–300. Couteron P. An operational, additive framework for species diversity partitioning and beta-diversity analysis

Restricted access

-Neto. 2005. Analyzing beta diversity: partitioning the spatial variation of community composition data. Ecol. Monogr. 75: 435–450. Peres-Neto P.R. Analyzing beta diversity: partitioning

Restricted access
Community Ecology
Authors: G. Bacaro, D. Rocchini, C. Duprè, M. Diekmann, F. Carnesecchi, V. Gori, and A. Chiarucci

diversity: partitioning the spatial variation of community composition data. Ecol. Monogr. 75: 435–450. Peres-Neto P.R. Analyzing beta diversity: partitioning the spatial variation of

Restricted access