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This paper seeks to reconstruct some of the characteristics of Hipponax as storyteller, drawing on the insights of narrative theory. It pays particular attention to the implied audience(s) of the poems, to the characterization of the narrator and the relation of narrator to author, to narrative time and to the role of repetition.

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At the beginning of the 7th century B.C., the Lydian political system and the religious life underwent a great transformation. The charges of a military and a cultic functionary working in the epoch of the Heraclidae disappeared, and a kind of centralised monarchy (named by the Greeks tyrannis) was introduced by the founder of the Mermnadae dynasty. The god Candaulas worshipped by the Heraclidae has lost his importance, and the cult of Artimuš was preferred by the Mermnadae. It is problematic whether Candaulas (*Kantawla-) has anything to do with dog or dog-sacrifice, which was at home rather in Caria. Candaulas was, as Hipponax says, the Lydian “Hermes”, whose cult could be very popular in West Anatolia at a certain stage of the economic and social development.

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was provided with a ritual remedy for his blood-guilt. See Parke (n. 16) 60. 34 Faraone, C. A.: Hipponax Fragment 128W: Epic Parody or Expulsive Incantation? ClAnt 23.2 (2004) 209

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