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Abstract  

Journal self-citation is one of the crucial bibliometric indicators, which measures the contribution of a journal towards a speciality. Journal self-citation rate is normalised by adapting a two stage refinement. The normalised self-citing rates are compared with external cited rate to know the self and external influence of journals.

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Abstract  

The aim of this study was to ascertain the possible effect of journal self-citations on the increase in the impact factors of journals in which this scientometric indicator rose by a factor of at least four in only a few years. Forty-three journals were selected from the Thomson—Reuters (formerly ISI) Journal Citation Reports as meeting the above criterion. Eight journals in which the absolute number of citations was lower than 20 in at least two years were excluded, so the final sample consisted of 35 journals. We found no proof of widespread manipulation of the impact factor through the massive use of journal self-citations.

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Abstract  

Impact factors are a widely accepted means for the assessment of journal quality. However, journal editors have possibilities to influence the impact factor of their journals, for example, by requesting authors to cite additional papers published recently in that journal thus increasing the self-citation rate. I calculated self-citation rates of journals ranked in the Journal Citation Reports of ISI in the subject category “Ecology” (n = 107). On average, self citation was responsible for 16.2 � 1.3% (mean � SE) of the impact factor in 2004. The self-citation rates decrease with increasing journal impact, but even high impact journals show large variation. Six journals suspected to request for additional citations showed high self-citation rates, which increased over the last seven years. To avoid further deliberate increases in self-citation rates, I suggest to take journal-specific self-citation rates into account for journal rankings.

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Summary  

We investigated the distribution of citations included in documents labeled by the ISI as “editorial material” and how they contribute to the impact factor of journals in which the citing items were published. We studied all documents classified by the ISI as “editorial material” in the Science Citation Index between 1999 and 2004 (277,231 records corresponding to editorial material published in 6141 journals). The results show that most journals published only a few documents that included 1 or 2 citations that contributed to the impact factor, although a few journals published many such documents. The data suggest that manipulation of the impact factor by publishing large amounts of editorial material with many citations to the journal itself is not a widely used strategy to increase the impact factor.

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of author self-citations as opposed to journal self-citations (Hartley 2009 ). Such author self-citations contribute to the overall citation count of an article and to the impact factor of the journals in which they are cited (Anseel et al

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science; and the sociology, history and philosophy of science contributed to the references of 47.3 and 56.9% for the year of 1990 and 2000, respectively. Moreover, it was found that there is a significant increase in journal self-citation

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social sciences, and as a benchmark for newer journals in a range of ISI disciplines. In addition to evaluating the most highly cited journals in these 20 ISI categories, the paper examines the impact of journal self citations on journal performance

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Abstract  

We studied the influence of the number of citations, the number of citable items and the number of journal self-citations on increases in the impact factor (IF) in 123 journals from the Journal Citation Reports database in which this scientometric indicator had decreased during the previous four years. In general, we did not find evidence that abuse of journal self-citations contributed to the increase in the impact factor after several years of decreases.

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Abstract  

The impact factor and the journal self-citation rate of 22 newly launched chemistry journals has been investigated. The dependence of these indicators on the journal's age was found to be rather characteristic to the initial period of a journal's life cycle.

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