Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 150 items for :

  • Medical and Health Sciences x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All

kinetics for analysis of growth data with substrate- inhibition . Biotechnol Bioeng 29 , 242 – 248 ( 1987 ). 14. Coppi , M. V. , Leang , C. , Sandler , S. J. , Lovley

Restricted access

This article reviews the literature dealing with the effects of composition and quality of diet and feeding time on the pharmacokinetics and efficacy of some anthelmintic drugs in ruminants. Studies have suggested that greater availability, and therefore improved anthelmintic activity, is possible through temporary feed restriction. It is also recommended that anthelmintic drugs should not be given to animals whilst they are maintained on large feed intakes, particularly of lush pasture that promotes rapid gastric transit, as this may reduce drug availability and anthelmintic efficacy. Generally, feeding animals low-quality fibrous diets reduces the passage rate of digesta and allows more time for absorption of several anthelmintic drugs and their metabolites from the gut. Some kinetic data of drugs given to animals on such diets may be slightly different, but this does not necessarily indicate alteration of the dosages of the anthelmintic drug. Nonetheless, due consideration should be given to anthelmintic dosages under various dietary regimes if optimum efficacy is to be achieved at all times.

Restricted access
Acta Veterinaria Hungarica
Authors: Daniel Padilla, Begoña Acosta Hernández, José Ramos Vivas, Soraya Déniz, Inmaculada Rosario, José Luís Martín Barrasa, Andrés sánchez Henao, Freddy Silva Sergent, María josé Ramos Sosa, Natalia García Álvarez, and Fernando Real

ability to invade these cells ( Kawula et al., 1996 ). Despite the importance of nonphagocytic cells such as RTG-2 as a model of elucidating the pathogenicity of Y. ruckeri in fish species, the kinetics of cell invasion by this bacterium has

Restricted access

Disposition kinetics and urinary excretion of ceftriaxone were investigated in healthy crossbred calves after its single intravenous administration (10 mg kg–1). Based on kinetic parameters, an appropriate dosage regimen of ceftriaxone in calves was calculated. The peak plasma level of ceftriaxone at 1 min was 84.0 ± 1.55 μg ml–1 which declined to 0.43 ± 0.05 μg ml1 at 8 h. The value of elimination half-life (t1/2α), volume of distribution Vd (area) and total body clearance (ClB) were 4.39 ± 0.63 h, 1.91 ± 0.19 L kg–1 and 0.31 ± 0.01 L kg–1 h–1, respectively. Approximately 41 per cent of total administered drug was recovered in the urine within 24 h of its administration. The plasma protein binding of ceftriaxone was found to be concentration dependent with an overall mean of 38.55 per cent. The binding capacity of ceftriaxone to plasma proteins and the dissociation rate constant of protein-drug complex were 20.1 × 10–8 ± 18.4 × 10–8 mole g–1 and 1.07 × 10–6 ± 0.52 × 10–6 mole, respectively. An appropriate intravenous dosage regimen of ceftriaxone in cattle would be 12 mg kg–1 repeated at 24 h.

Restricted access
Acta Veterinaria Hungarica
Authors: Duygu Durna Corum, Orhan Corum, Ramazan Yildiz, Hatice Eser Faki, Merve Ider, Gul Cetin, and Kamil Uney

levofloxacin in male camels ( Camelus dromedarius ) . J. Vet. Pharmacol. Therapeut. 32 , 296 – 299 . 10.1111/j.1365-2885.2008.01023.x 9758306 Goudah , A. and Hasabelnaby , S. ( 2010 ): Disposition kinetics of levofloxacin in sheep after intravenous

Restricted access

To clarify the ventilatory kinetics during recovery after impulse-like exercise, subjects performed one impulse-like exercise test (one-impulse) and a five-times repeated impulse-like exercises test (five-impulse). Duration and intensity of the impulse-like exercise were 20 sec and 400 watts (80 rpm), respectively. Although blood pH during recovery (until 10 min) was significantly lower in the five-impulse test than in the one-impulse test, ventilation (.VE) in the two tests was similar except during the first 30 sec of recovery, in which it was higher in the five-impulse test. In one-impulse, blood CO2 pressure (PCO2) was significantly increased at 1 min during recovery and then returned to the pre-exercise level at 5 min during recovery. In the five-impulse test, PCO2 at 1 min during recovery was similar to the pre-exercise level, and then it decreased to a level lower than the pre-exercise level at 5 min during recovery. Accordingly, PCO2 during recovery (until 30 min) was significantly lower in the five-impulse than in one-impulse test..VE and pH during recovery showed a curvilinear relationship, and at the same pH, ventilation was higher in the one-impulse test. These results suggest that ventilatory kinetics during recovery after impulse-like exercise is attributed partly to pH, but the stimulatory effect of lower pH is diminished by the inhibitory effect of lower PCO2.

Restricted access

.J. Thompson A.J. Muir M.S. Sulkowski 2010 Interleukin-28B polymorphism improves viral kinetics and is the

Restricted access
Imaging
Authors: Sachini Udara Wickramasinghe, Thushara Indika Weerakoon, Pradeep Jayantha Gamage, Muditha S. Bandara, and Aruna Pallewatte

, Thomas K , Englander S , et al. : Textural kinetics: a novel dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI feature for breast lesion

Open access

, Matsunari I , Schmidt G , Schwaiger M : Kinetics of 123I

Open access

A bioluminescent derivative of Bacillus subtilis containing a plasmid encoding a luxAB fusion under control of a vegetative promoter and gives bioluminescence upon addition of an exogenous long-chain aldehyde has been used as test organism. Its spore populations have been produced and their heat- and radiation survival curves established. Heat-sensitization effect of pre-irradiation of spores was proven not only by colony counting but also with differential scanning calorimetry. Under a linearly programmed temperature increase, the heat destruction of spores surviving 2.5 kGy gamma irradiation resulted in at a few centigrade lower temperature than that of untreated spores. Heat denaturation endotherms in the DSC-thermogram of irradiated spores were shifted to lower temperatures as well. Comparative turbidimetric, luminometric and phase-contrast microscopic studies of untreated, heat-treated and irradiated spore populations showed that the kinetics of germination and the light emission during germination of radiation-inactivated spores were the same as those of untreated spores, revealing that the pre-formed luciferase enzyme packaged into the spores during sporulation remained intact after an irradiation dose causing 90% decrease in number of colony forming spores. Therefore, in contrast to heat-treated spores, the initial bioluminescence reading upon germination of irradiated spores does not reflect the viable count of their population.

Restricted access