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Acta Alimentaria
Authors:
I. Tahiri
,
S. de Paz-Cantos
,
A. González-Marrón
,
À. Cartanyà-Hueso
,
E.M. Navarrete-Muñoz
,
J.C. Martín-Sánchez
,
C. Lidón-Moyano
,
H. Pérez-Martín
, and
J.M. Martínez-Sánchez

deleterious effects ( Ríos-Hernández et al., 2017 ; George et al., 2021 ). In spite of the net benefits in health of the adherence to the MD, this adherence has decreased during the last decades in many countries, including Spain ( Gasol Foundation, 2019

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Quality of durum wheat is of importance for pasta production. Our aim was to evaluate the quality of released durum wheat at Ethiopia by the use of pheno-quality traits as well as composition and amount and size distribution of proteins; these attributes were also compared with the same ones for Spanish released wheat grown in the same environment. Large variation was obtained among the released durum wheat for all parameters investigated. The evaluation of protein parameters indicated the varieties Klinto, LD-357, Tob-66 and Ude to have suitable protein composition for pasta production, while Tob-66 showed high protein concentration and Tob-66, LD-357 and Yerer showed high gluten strength. The most promising Ethiopian variety for pasta production as to the results from the present study was Tob-66. Also, LD-357 showed promising protein characteristics, although the kernels were white, which is not desired for pasta production. Some of the evaluated varieties might be of interest for production of local leavened bread although the quality is not good enough for pasta production.

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Acta Phytopathologica et Entomologica Hungarica
Authors:
Éva Szita
,
Maria Amparo Blay Goicoechea
,
Mercedes París
, and
Mehmet Bora Kaydan

Introduction The scale insect checklist of Spain currently contains 229 species belonging to 18 families ( García Morales et al., 2016 ). Spain has a long tradition in coccidology from the 19th century by Colvée (1881 , 1882) , but the most

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The best alternative for reducing citrus production costs is mechanization. Machine vision is a reliable technology for the automatic inspection of fresh fruits and vegetables that can be adapted to harvesting machines. In these, fruits can be inspected before sending them to the packinghouse and machine vision provides important information for subsequent processing and avoids spending further resources in non-marketable fruit. The present work describes a computer vision system installed on a harvesting machine developed jointly by IVIA and a Spanish enterprise. In this machine, hand pickers directly drop the fruit as they collect it, which results in an important increase of productivity. The machine vision system is placed over rollers in order to inspect the produce, and separate those that can be directly sent to the fresh market from those that do not meet minimal quality requirements but can be used by the processing industry, based on color, size and the presence of surface damages. The system was tested under field conditions.

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, C., Rharrabti, Y., García del Moral, L.F. 2005. Using AFLPs to determine phylogenetic relationships and genetic erosion in durum wheat cultivars released in Italy and Spain throughout the 20th century. Field Crops Res. 91 :107

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The identification of the drivers of diversity in understorey plant assemblages is a major challenge in forest ecology. However, it is not yet fully understood whether the same factors consistently affect different facets of species organization, such as species richness, composition and turnover. Here, we compare the influence of fine-scale environmental variables and spatial organization on the herb-layer flora of two unmanaged and ecologically different forest stands in the Muniellos Biosphere Reserve, Northern Spain. The aims of our study are to identify the most important factors influencing different facets of herb-layer plant organization, and to test whether the effect of such drivers is consistent across facets and forest types. We used Generalized Linear Models, Redundancy Analysis and Multiple Regression on Distance Matrices to model, respectively, the response of species richness, species composition and species turnover to spatial distances as well as to several environmental factors, including forest structure, light conditions, soil and topographical features. We observed a substantial consistency among variables affecting the different facets of ground-layer species organization within stands, with a subset of topographical variables with a transversal effect across facets. Although potential solar radiation was the main variable influencing species richness in the two stands, the factors shaping species composition and turnover varied across forest types: in the beech stand, slope and canopy openness were the main determinants of herb-layer species diversity and turnover; in the oak stand, the main drivers of species composition were related to topography and spatial structure, while spatial distance was the main driver of species turnover. Our study shows that the ecological processes driving fine-scale variation of ground-layer plant richness and composition are similar to those driving species turnover. Although the ecological factors shaping different facets may be the same, we highlight that, at least in temperate forests, these factors are system-specific and vary according to forest types.

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Blueberry (Vaccinium spp.) cultivation has experienced a notable increase both for its good organoleptic characteristics and the nutritional and functional properties of this berry. The aim of this study was the physicochemical characterization of blueberry juices obtained from 55 blueberry cultivars grown under the same environmental conditions for 2–4 years. The results provide a broad and robust database, both for the number of cultivars and the periods of monitoring thereof, in order to cover different aspects of blueberry processing, and more specifically, production of juices. Blueberries belonging to V. virgatum cultivars showed the higher values of total anthocyanin content, total phenolic content, antioxidant activity, soluble solids, and pH, and V. corymbosum cultivars the higher level of titratable acidity. Results also showed a high variability among cultivars. Observed variations can be used in plant breeding and classification of blueberry cultivars, at least, at the species level.

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Samples of sweet wines from the Canary Islands belonging to the Denominations of Origin of La Palma and Lanzarote islands were analysed in relation to chemical parameters. The main chemical parameters analysed demonstrated that these wines fulfil all the legal requirements, since the content of all components tested falls below the maximum concentration admissible. Applying techniques of multivariate analysis (principal component, discriminant and cluster analysis), a complete differentiation could be achieved between the wines according to the island of production using only alcohol degree and isobutanol, which are chemical parameters related to the elaboration process.

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Acta Botanica Hungarica
Authors:
S. Y. Kondratyuk
,
D. K. Upreti
,
G. K. Mishra
,
S. Nayaka
,
K. K. Ingle
,
O. O. Orlov
,
A. S. Kondratiuk
,
L. Lőkös
,
E. Farkas
,
J.-J. Woo
, and
J.-S. Hur

Eight species, new for science, i.e.: Lobothallia gangwondoana S. Y. Kondr., J.-J. Woo et J.-S. Hur and Phyllopsora dodongensis S. Y. Kondr. et J.-S. Hur from South Korea, Eastern Asia, Ioplaca rinodinoides S. Y. Kondr., K. K. Ingle, D. K. Upreti et S. Nayaka, Letrouitia assamana S. Y. Kondr., G. K. Mishra et D. K. Upreti, and Rusavskia indochinensis S. Y. Kondr., D. K. Upreti et S. Nayaka from India and China, South Asia, Caloplaca orloviana S. Y. Kondr. and Rusavskia drevlyanica S. Y. Kondr. et O. O. Orlov from Ukraine, Eastern Europe, as well as Xanthoria ibizaensis S. Y. Kondr. et A. S. Kondr. from Ibiza Island, Spain, Mediterranean Europe, are described, illustrated and compared with closely related taxa.

Fominiella tenerifensis S. Y. Kondr., Kärnefelt, A. Thell et Feuerer is for the first time recorded from Mediterranean Europe, Huriella loekoesiana S. Y. Kondr. et Upreti is provided from Russia for the first time, and H. pohangensis S. Y. Kondr., L. Lőkös et J.-S. Hur for the first time from China, Phoma candelariellae Z. Kocakaya et Halıcı is new to Ukraine, and Staurothele frustulenta Vain. is recorded from the Forest Zone of Ukraine for the first time.

Twelve new combinations, i.e.: Bryostigma apotheciorum (for Sphaeria apotheciorum A. Massal.), Bryostigma biatoricola (for Arthonia biatoricola Ihlen et Owe-Larss.), Bryostigma dokdoense (for Arthonia dokdoensis S. Y. Kondr., L. Lőkös, B. G. Lee, J.-J. Woo et J.-S. Hur), Bryostigma epiphyscium (for Arthonia epiphyscia Nyl.), Bryostigma lobariellae (for Arthonia lobariellae Etayo), Bryostigma lapidicola (for Lecidea lapidicola Taylor), Bryostigma molendoi (for Tichothecium molendoi Heufl. ex Arnold), Bryostigma neglectulum (for Arthonia neglectula Nyl.), Bryostigma parietinarium (for Arthonia parietinaria Hafellner et Fleischhacker), Bryostigma peltigerinum (for Arthonia vagans var. peltigerina Almq.), Bryostigma phaeophysciae (for Arthonia phaeophysciae Grube et Matzer), Bryostigma stereocaulinum (for Arthonia nephromiaria var. stereocaulina Ohlert), are proposed based on results of combined phylogenetic analysis based on mtSSU and RPB2 gene sequences.

Thirty-one new combinations for members of the genus Polyozosia (i.e.: Polyozosia actophila (for Lecanora actophila Wedd.), Polyozosia agardhiana (for Lecanora agardhiana Ach.), Polyozosia altunica (for Myriolecis altunica R. Mamut et A. Abbas), Polyozosia antiqua (for Lecanora antiqua J. R. Laundon), Polyozosia bandolensis (for Lecanora bandolensis B. de Lesd.), Polyozosia behringii (for Lecanora behringii Nyl.), Polyozosia caesioalutacea (for Lecanora caesioalutacea H. Magn.), Polyozosia carlottiana (for Lecanora carlottiana C. J. Lewis et Śliwa), Polyozosia congesta (for Lecanora congesta Clauzade et Vězda), Polyozosia eurycarpa (for Lecanora eurycarpa Poelt, Leuckert et Cl. Roux), Polyozosia expectans (Lecanora expectans Darb.), Polyozosia flowersiana (Lecanora flowersiana H. Magn.), Polyozosia fugiens (for Lecanora fugiens Nyl.), Polyozosia invadens (for Lecanora invadens H. Magn.), Polyozosia juniperina (for Lecanora juniperina Śliwa), Polyozosia latzelii (for Lecanora latzelii Zahlbr.), Polyozosia liguriensis (for Lecanora liguriensis B. de Lesd.), Polyozosia massei (for Myriolecis massei M. Bertrand et J.-Y. Monnat), Polyozosia mons-nivis (for Lecanora mons-nivis Darb.), Polyozosia oyensis (for Lecanora oyensis M.-P. Bertrand et Cl. Roux), Polyozosia percrenata (for Lecanora percrenata H. Magn.), Polyozosia persimilis (for Lecanora hagenii subsp. persimilis Th. Fr.), Polyozosia poeltiana (for Lecanora poeltiana Clauzade et Cl. Roux), Polyozosia prominens (for Lecanora prominens Clauzade et Vězda), Polyozosia prophetae-eliae (for Lecanora prophetae-eliae Sipman), Polyozosia salina (for Lecanora salina H. Magn.), Polyozosia schofieldii (for Lecanora schofieldii Brodo), Polyozosia sverdrupiana (for Lecanora sverdrupiana Øvstedal), Polyozosia torrida (for Lecanora torrida Vain.), Polyozosia wetmorei (for Lecanora wetmorei Śliwa), Polyozosia zosterae (for Lecanora subfusca? zosterae Ach.)) are proposed.

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96 Caballero, P., Aldebis, H.K., Vargas-Osuna E. and Santiago-Alvarez, C. 1992. Epizootics caused by a nuclear polyhedrosis virus in populations of Spodoptera exigua in southern Spain

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