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Abstract  

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are the main factors involved in pollution control and global warming in industrialized nations. Various treatment methods involving incineration, adsorption, etc., were employed to reduce VOCs concentration. Various absorbents, such as activated carbon, zeolite, silica gel or alumina, and so on were broadly used to adsorb VOCs in various industrial applications. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was handled to analyze the thermal characteristics of absorbents. Typically, a scanning electron microscope (SEM) has been used to evaluate the structure variation of absorbents under high temperature situations. In view of pollution control and loss prevention, versatility and analysis of recycled adsorbents are necessary and useful for various industrial applications.

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A calorimetric method is proposed to evaluate the catalytic activity of a solid catalyst with respect to the exothermic oxidation of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC).

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Journal of Thermal Analysis and Calorimetry
Authors: Sheng-Hung Wu, Chu-Chin Hsieh, Chung-Cheng Chiang, Jao-Jia Horng, Wei-Ping Pan, and Chi-Min Shu

Introduction Carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) (65% in green house gases) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are commonly target pollutants worldwide that have caused global warming and environmental pollution. VOCs have adverse

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], rapeseed oil has become a highly acclaimed vegetable oil in the market and is often used as flavor enhancer in Asian countries [ 3 ]. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are typical secondary characteristic compounds existing in vegetable oils [ 4 ], playing

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Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry
Authors: S. Matthews, A. Boegel, S. Eccles, S. Homann, D. Rice, J. Loftis, M. Jovanovich, R. Caufield, B. Mincher, D. Meikrantz, R. Murphy, G. Gresham, and M. Connoly

Abstract  

The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) are jointly investigating the decomposition of chlorinated hydrocarbons using bremsstrahlung radiation produced by electron accelerators and gamma photons from spent reactor fuel. Experimental results demonstrate an exponential type decay of concentration with dose for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in ground water and for both polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and insecticides in organic solutions. Experiments were performed at several photon energies and dose rates with various initial concentrations. Mass balance analysis suggests complete mineralization of VOCs in ground water and indicates significant degradation of PCBs and insecticides to VOC type compounds in organic solutions.

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Study of the polymerization of acrylic resins by photocalorimetry

Influence of initiators and irradiation wavelength

Journal of Thermal Analysis and Calorimetry
Authors: Y. Irmouli, B. George, and A. Merlin

Abstract  

Due to their advantages from an environmental point of view (i.e. reduction of volatile organic compounds (VOC)), photocurable finishes should be extensively used for industrial wood joinery in the near future. However, several problems are reported, particularly the poor durability of the finishing system. In the present work, the curing reaction of acrylic resins containing some improved photoinitiators was studied by means of photocalorimetry under monochromatic irradiation from 366 to 450 nm. The results show that finishes can be cured even under daylight so that they could be directly applied on site in case of restoration.

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Abstract  

The chemical and physical properties of218Po immediately following its formation from222Rn decay are important in determining its behavior in indoor atmospheres and play a major part in determining its potential health effects. In 88% of the decays, a singly charged, positive ion of218Po is obtained at the end of its recoil path. These ions can interact with water vapor or other volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that may exist in indoor air. The ions can be neutralized by 3 different mechanisms, small-ion recombination, electron transfer, and electron scavenging. In typical indoor air, the ion will be rapidly neutralized by transfer of electrons from lower ionization potential gases such as NO2. The neutral molecule can then become incorporated in ultrafine particles formed by the radiolytic processes in the recoil path. These particles will typically be formed by the presence of the air ions produced by the passage of the emitted -particle through ion-induced nucleation. In addition these energetic ions can react with water molecules to produce hydroxyl radicals. Thus, the decay of the radon nucleus produces a variety of effects and can result in changes in the size of the radioactive species that includes the radon progeny.

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Introduction Catalytic oxidation is one of the most efficient processes for volatile organic compound (VOC) destruction because it takes place at lower temperatures than those required for thermal destruction. Most of the

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highly effective in the treatment of contaminated water and air [ 1 – 11 ]. Photooxidation on TiO 2 surface irradiated with suitable UV radiation leads to the degradation and complete mineralization of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into

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hydrogenphtalate [ 1 ], metsulfuron-methyl [ 2 ], phenol and Methylene Blue [ 3 , 4 ], 2-chlorophenol [ 5 ], thionine, Eosin-Y, Rhodamine B [ 6 ], Reactive Black [ 4 , 7 ], volatile organic compounds (VOCs) [ 8 ]. In all the presented studies, organic

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