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During the last few years around a dozen boycotts have been called in Hungary; there are several ecologically and socially aware food-communities directly linking consumers and producers; at the end of 2006 a Fair Trade shop opened in Budapest, and there are product campaigns which accentuate various patriotic themes. All of these initiatives signal the emergence of new attitudes and values, a new type of behavior, that of ethical consumption . Ethical consumption, new kinds of consumer needs are influencing market culture through the creation of various market-niches (see corporate social responsibility); furthermore, the wide-scale spread of ethical consumption can even lead to the transformation of market functions. The modern market is going from a mainly economic space to an area of moral action, a tool of regulation and social participation. As a social movement ethical consumerism can effect political culture and play an important role in public policy aiming towards sustainable development. According to West-European literature as well as to concrete experience ethical consumerism is more and more playing this role, the local appearance of the movement beckons the question: what sort of values and institutions characterize this new consumer culture, and which of these can we encounter in Hungary? The first part of this study deals with the phenomena of ethical consumption: it gives an overview of the literature, explicating the main research themes, and introducing its distinctive, most often examined forms of action. In the second part of the study, out of the interpretational possibilities, I look at ethical consumption as political consumption, as a form of social governance, examining its relevance as a way of public participation. I try to find an answer to the question whether the spread of ethical consumption should be imagined at the demise of classical political institutions, or as complementary to them, and which ethical issues are most likely to mobilize the public. The study is primarily based on data describing Hungarian political participatory culture, as well as an attitude survey of a representative sample. At the end of the study I will briefly refer to the possible causes of differences in ethical consumption attitudes and behaviors.

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. However, the current curriculum and teaching practices reproduce the images and bias about people from Africa rooted in colonialism, who need the assistance and redemption of the Whites. Instead of this, movements such as the Bristol Bus Boycotts or

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identity. In Hungary, the governing parties have consistently exploited their overwhelming parliamentary majority; since the latter unilaterally adopted a new constitution in 2011 42 (while the constitution-making process was boycotted by a large part of

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exemplified by the political events of 2007 when parties belonging to the anti-government opposition boycotted parliamentary elections in protest against anti-democratic actions taken by the presidential political camp. 6 All in

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their influence in the legal solutions of North Macedonia 5 and Bosnia and Herzegovina as well. In practice, however, Serbs in Kosovo are fundamentally negative towards the state of Kosovo (boycotting elections, non

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boycott of East India Company tea, Pennsylvania Gazette , 20 October 1773 at para. 6. Ibid. para. 7. Committees of Correspondence. John Adams, Diary, Braintree

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from parents as proof of children’s nationality ( Pells, 2017 ). The campaign group Against Borders for Children (ABC) organized a mass boycott of the data collection, urging parents to refuse to hand over children’s personal data ( Liberty, 2019

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-thirds majority under the new favourable electoral rules. In spring of 2011, the Parliament, in the absence of the two democratic opposition parties (which, protesting against the ‘destruction of the rule of law’, boycotted the whole constitution-making process

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political authorities. In response, the judicial associations called on judges to boycott the appointments to the new National Council of the Judiciary. The call was a success: only 18 out of 10,000 Polish judges agreed to stand for appointment to the 15

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