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The present paper is devoted to the centenary of the remarkably popular poet and outstanding master of the Russian language, Alexander Tvardovsky (1910–1971). His artistic personality was marked by a peculiar double bind that caused him much anguish and risky conflicts despite all the honours he had received in his life. On the one hand, he cherished the idea of humanitarian communism compatible with democracy and the dignity of the individual; on the other, he was profoundly devoted to truth, and definitely insisted on his right and poetic duty to voice it. During the course of time he became more and more conscious of the illusory nature of his ideals. In his longer poems he represented the great turns in the life of Soviet society. Tvardovsky developed a flexible and terse style based on vigorous everyday popular speech; in post-war years this style has become loftier and more philosophic following (but not imitating) the tradition of Pushkin. Tvardovsky’s activities as the chief editor of the journal Novy Mir opened a significant turn in the literary life of his country promising the approach of an epoch of enlightenment and free speech.

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The collection presenting is a rather variegated one, a miscellany. It contains postcards written in Hungarian to the young violonists Adila (nickname for Adrienne) and Jelly Arányi between 1902 and 1907, letters to their youngest sister, pianist Titi (nickname for Hortense), from the early 1920s, two Hungarian letters to the ethnomusicologist Béla Vikár and one to the pianist Ernő Balogh, German letters to the pianist Gottfried Galston and to the British composer Philip Heseltine (alias Peter Warlock) from 1920 and 1921, respectively. Three letters in French were written to the musicologist Henry Pruničres and Robert Bernard (both of them chief editors of La Revue Musicale) in the 1920s and 1930s while letters, some of them previously unpublished, were addressed to one of Bartók's most devoted American pupil Wilhelmine Creel from the late 1920s and early 1940s. The Hungarian letters are published in English tradition side by side with their original texts.

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Hungarian agricultural scientists who published new research results in the 1950s generally submitted their manuscripts to Acta Agronomica Hungarica, which also provided a forum for the development of international cooperation. When the journal was established it published original papers, reviews, lectures and short communications on agricultural sciences in English, Russian, German and French. It was edited in Budapest, first by András Somos and later by János Surányi. In 1965 the editorial office was transferred to the Agricultural Research Institute of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Martonvásár, where Sándor Rajki converted it into an English language journal and also made substantial changes to its structure. From 1983 Acta Agronomica was edited in the University of Horticulture and Food Industry, Budapest, with István Tamássy and later Pál Kozma as chief editor. After 12 years, in May 1995, the Agricultural Sciences Section of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences again charged the Agricultural Research Institute of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Martonvásár, with the editing of the journal, and since 2000 Zoltán Bedő has been the chief editor. The editorial board of Acta Agronomica Hungarica still regards the publication of the results achieved in basic and applied research on agricultural science as its primary task, with the emphasis on crop research. Preference is given to research on physiology, genetics, crop production, plant breeding, cell and molecular biology, nature and environment protection, and the preservation of gene reserves. The professional standard, recognition, market value and time to publication have improved considerably in recent years. This can be attributed partly to the setting up of an International Advisory Board in addition to the Hungarian Editorial Committee, and partly to the computerised editing and to the precise, conscientious work of the reviewers.

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Pál Kozma, a scientist famous throughout Europe for his work on vines, was born into a poor peasant family in the small village of Gyulaháza in Szabolcs-Szatmár-Bereg County in Eastern Hungary on 11 July 1920. Despite his thirst for knowledge, he was obliged to interrupt his studies on several occasions due to the poverty of his family, and it was not until 1947 that he finally graduated from the University of Agriculture with a first class honours degree in agriculture, specialising in horticulture and vine-growing. The following year he obtained his teaching diploma, again with first-class honours. In 1947 he started work as an assistant inspector of viticulture in Tarcal, later moving to the Technical College for Horticulture and Viticulture in Miklóstelep, where he was employed as a teacher and viticulture inspector. From 1949 onwards he worked in the Department of Viticulture at the Faculty of Horticulture and Viticulture of the University of Agricultural Sciences, filling the post of Head of Department from 1960 until he retired in 1990. From 1962-1965 he was Vice-Rector of the University, followed by six years as Rector from 1965-1971. The basic and applied research he carried out from 1948 onwards gave a new direction to viticulture. His field of research included the flowering biology of the vine (flower morphology, histology, divergence and evolution of flower types, special types of fertilisation and grape formation in various flower types, light and electron microscope studies on morphological traits), vine breeding through selection and crossing (intra- and interspecific hybrids of white and red wine grapes and table grape varieties), leaf analysis for the study of the organic and mineral metabolism of vines and the diagnosis of optimum nutrient supplies, transpiration, the physiological effects of cultivation and pruning methods, the physiology of vine branches, improved technologies for the cultivation of table grapes, and the history of viticulture. In addition to the success he achieved in scientific research, he was also an excellent teacher. His students left the university with a high standard of knowledge and many of them distinguished themselves in later life. In recognition of his achievements he was given many awards, including the State Prize in 1975 and the Order of the Hungarian Republic in 1990. He received a prize from the publishers for his books entitled "Table Grapes" in 1962 and "Vines and Their Cultivation I-II" in 1994. He also received a number of international awards, including the OIV Prize (1964, 1994), the Humboldt Memorial Plaque (1968) and the Hegel Medal, Berlin (1970). He was a member of the Editorial Committee of Acta Agronomica Hungarica from 1967 to 1994 and Chief Editor from 1995 to 2000. Those who were privileged to know Pál Kozma found him to be a good-humoured and extremely well-informed man, with an enormous thirst for new knowledge and the determination which had stood him in good stead in his rise from the depths of poverty to the heights of an academic career. He was not only highly intelligent, but also extremely hard-working, never allowing difficulties to hinder him in his quest for knowledge. He will be sadly missed, but his influence will remain with us in his books and in the work of the experts he trained so well.

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Central European Geology
Authors:
Ubul Fügedi
,
László Kuti
,
Daniella Tolmács
,
Ildikó Szentpétery
,
Barbara Kerék
,
Tímea Dobos
,
András Sebők
, and
Rita Szeiler

. Bidovec, L. Martins 2006: Factor analysis interpretation of European soil, stream sediment and floodplain sediment data. Annex 5 in: Salminen, R. (chief-editor) et al. 2006: - Geochemical Atlas of Europe. Part 2. - Interpretation of Geochemical Maps

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Zelenai, Ágnes Jekl, Sára Sánta, Tünde Vágási, Dominika Kovács, Ákos Zimonyi, Attila Gonda, and many others whom I cannot all list here. I wish to express my gratitude also to László Takács, chief editor of the Acta Antiqua Academiae Scientiarum

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gratitude to László Takács, chief editor of the Acta Antiqua Academiae Scientiarum Hungaricae for accepting and publishing the following nine papers in the present fascicle of this renowned journal which previously published the papers of the first event

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Bartók and the Violin

Proceedings of the symposium held on 14–15 September 2017 in the Bartók Hall of the Institute for Musicology, Research Centre for the Humanities of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences in collaboration with the Liszt Ferenc Academy of Music

Studia Musicologica
Author:
László VIKÁRIUS

Bartók studies thanks to their appearance in the International Journal of Musicology (2005), of which he served as chief editor. *** Bartók was a pianist, but at the same time, he was a chamber musician with great performance experience

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Regional Editors Editors-in-Chief Editor Editor-in-Chief Editor-in-Chief Emeritus

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); others discourage multiple-part manuscripts (e.g., Journal of Neuroscience ); and yet others prohibit them (e.g., International Journal of Computer Mathematics ). I serve as the Chief Editor for Monthly Weather Review ( MWR ), which is one of

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