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53 56 Dhawan, R., Singh, K., Bains, N.S., (2003) Effect of pre-regeneration colchicine treatments on the efficiency of wheat × maize system of haploid production in wheat

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An investigation to standardize the protocol for in vitro application of colchicine for enhancing the doubled haploid production in wheat was done. Two tetraploid (PDW-314 and A-9-30-1); and two hexaploid (DH-40 and C-306) wheat genotypes were used as maternal parents, whereas, the pollen sources involved Zea mays (cv. Bajaura Makka) and Imperata cylindrica. During the rabi seasons of years 2013–14 and 2014–15, wheat × maize and wheat × I. cylindrica hybridization was carried out followed by treatment of their haploids produced as a result of elimination of chromosomes of maize and I. cylindrica respectively, with varied doses of colchicine for different durations The various doses of colchicine were categorized into two groups: lower doses for longer durations (0.01, 0.025, 0.05% each for 5, 7, 9, 11 hrs) and higher doses for shorter durations (0.05, 0.075, 0.10, 0.15, 0.20, 0.25% each for 5, 4, 3, 2 hrs). The response of different concentrations of colchicine applied for varied durations revealed significant differences for various doubled haploidy parameters viz., per cent survived plants, per cent doubled haploid formation and per cent doubled haploid seed formation. In hexaploid and tetraploid wheats, colchicine doses of 0.075% for 4 hrs and 0.15% for 4 hrs, respectively were established as optimum for enhanced doubled haploid production.

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The Merck Index, 14th edn, monograph 2470 for colchicine, p. 414. S. Sweetman (ed.), Martindale, The Complete Drug Reference, 33rd edn, 2002, p. 400

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Cell Tissue Org. Cult. 17 161 170 Walker, R. (1938): The effect of colchicine on microspore mother cells

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Abstract  

This work reports the synthesis, radiolabeling and preliminary biodistribution results in tumor-bearing mice of the 99mTc(CO)3–AOPA colchicine conjugate. The novel ligand was successfully synthesized by conjugation of N-(acetyloxy)-2-picolylamino (AOPA) to deacetylcolchicine via a short carbonyl-methylene linker. Radiolabeling was performed in high yield with [99mTc(CO)3]+ core. 99mTc(CO)3–AOPA colchicine conjugate was hydrophilic and was stable at room temperature. Biodistribution studies in tumor-bearing mice showed that 99mTc(CO)3–AOPA colchicine conjugate accumulated in the tumor with good uptake and retention. However, its clearance from normal organs was not so fast, resulting in poor T/NT ratios. Further modification on the linker or/and 99mTc-chelate to improve the tumor targeting efficacy and in vivo kinetic profiles is currently in progress.

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Large numbers of genetically stable, homozygous plants are needed for classical and molecular breeding programmes. In vitro anther culture has proved to be a useful tool for haploid/doubled haploid (DH) induction in pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) for more than twenty years. The present paper reports on a great improvement in the in vitro haploid induction and genome duplication methods routinely used for resistance breeding in sweet and spice peppers by two Hungarian research institutions, the Agricultural Biotechnology Center in Gödöllő and the Budapest Research Unit of the Vegetable Crops Research Institute. As a result of the colchicine-stimulated early genome induction method, the critically low (<0.1%) regeneration frequency of spice pepper types became ten times greater, reaching a value of around 1.0%, though this was still considerably lower than that achieved in pepper varieties for fresh consumption (5-10%). Moreover, the ratio of useful doubled haploids was far higher (H:DH = 1:2 or 1:4) in some cases after colchicine treatment than that of untreated control plants (H:DH = 2:1 or 3:1, depending on the genotype). An efficient method with good reproducibility, requiring less manual work, was elaborated for the in vitro genome duplication of pepper haploid regenerants using colchicine. When the haploid induction ability of plants conventionally cultured in the greenhouse was compared to that of plants raised under artificial conditions in phytotron chambers (satisfactory day and night temperatures, illumination, humidity), the responsiveness of the latter microspores (ratio of plant regeneration) was found to be almost twice as high. The application of 3% maltose for six days at 35°C resulted in a 1.45% increase in the ratio of responding anthers and a 0.34% increase in plant regeneration, averaged over all the variety types. Phenosafranin staining was used for the analysis of microspore viability. The reduction in viability during the induction period proved to be less pronounced in lines with better androgenetic responses than in those with poorer responsiveness.

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191 824 825 Zatykó, J.M., Simon, I., Sági, F. 1965. Antimutagenic effect against colchicines of kinetin in black currant seedlings. Nature 205

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Gliomas are the largest group of central nervous system tumors and despite of clinical treatments death rate is very high. Inhibition of both cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase pathways that take role in arachidonic acid metabolism prevents cancer development and induces apoptosis. One of the most promising compounds that blocks both of these pathways is licofelone. Using colchicine and 5-fluorouracil as positive controls, we questioned whether licofelone affects the survival of rat glioma cell line (C6) and induces apoptosis in vitro. After growing the cells in culture, we determined viability with MT, apoptosis with flow cytometry and activity of caspase enzymes with real time PCR. All used doses of colchicine and 5-fluorouracil were cytotoxic and reduced the number of surviving C6 cells as much as 44% and 60%, respectively. Comparing to the control, treatments with 10, 50 and 100 μM licofelone for 24 or 48 h did not influence C6 survival, however, 150, 200 and 250 μM licofelone reduced the number of living cells by 58, 88 and 93%, respectively, and induced apoptosis of C6 cells in a dose and time dependent manner. Licofelone did not change the level of caspase-9, but increased the level of caspase-3. Comparing with 5-fluorouracil and colchicine, the present study reveals for the first time the possibility that licofelone possesses a strong dose and time dependent antiproliferative and proapoptotic properties on glioma cells.

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Abstract  

This work reports the synthesis and preliminary biodistribution results of [131I]SIB-PEG4-CHC in tumor-bearing mice. The tributylstannyl precursor ATE-PEG4-CHC was synthesized by conjugation of ATE to amino pegylated colchicine NH2-PEG4-CHC. [131I]SIB-PEG4-CHC was radiosynthesized by electrophilic destannylation of the precursor with a yield of ~44%. The radiochemical purity (RCP) appeared to be >95% by a Sep-Pak cartridge purification. [131I]SIB-PEG4-CHC was lipophilic and was stable at room temperature. Biodistribution studies in tumor-bearing mice showed that [131I]SIB-PEG4-CHC cleared from background rapidly, and didn’t deiodinate in vivo. However, the poor tumor localization excluded it from further investigations as a tumor-targeted radiopharmaceuticals.

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Alemanno, L., Guiderdoni, E. (1994): Increased doubled haploid plant regeneration from rice ( Oryza sativa L.) anthers cultured on colchicine-supplemented media. Plant Cell Rep. , 13 , 432

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