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in Our Folk Beliefs and Tradition. The Vampire and Other Beings in Our Folk Beliefs and Tradition]. Srpski Etnografski Zbornik LXVI : 5 - 255 . Dukova , Ute 1970 Das Bild der Drachen im bulgarischen Märchen [The Image of the Dragon in

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The soul of man resides in different parts of the body on each day of the month. The concerned body part should be handled with care, as if it is hurt, it causes extreme harm. The yurt, just like animals, also has a soul. The paper presents five small hand-books — from the collection of the Oriental Library of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, from the St. Petersburg Oriental Collection of the Russian Academy and from private possession — indicating the abode of the soul in humans, the yurt and animals.

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makes indirect reference to the weather srigoi of the corpus of folk beliefs, those strigoi against whom St. Elijah wins each battle, but the entities referred to are, in fact, the pathogenic agents of the disease, which have to be deactivated. THE

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people were reticent to call the Devil or other evil creatures, such as the wolf or snake, by their real name, particularly during Lent ( Brīvzemnieks 1881 :159). Some folk beliefs also state that if the devil is mentioned, he appears: “The word ‘devil

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” — “Diabeł”. [Folk Demonology. Demons of the Air — “Płanetnik” — “Demon of the Spin Air” — “Devil”]. Literatura ludowa No. 1 (29), 51–61. Brylak , Maria 1970: Wierzenia ludowe [Folk Beliefs]. In Reinfuss , Roman (ed

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Dimitrijević , S. M. 1926: Sveti Sava u narodnom verovanju i predanju, jedna od lako ostvarljivih dužnosti prema prosvetitelju našem [Saint Sava in Folk Beliefs and Narratives]. Beograd. Domazetovski , Petko 1979

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. Kvideland , R. – Sehmsdorf , H. ( 1991 ): Scandinavian Folk Belief and Legend . Oslo–London , Norwegian University Press . Nasıyri , Q. ( 1975 ): Saylanma Äsärlär

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], 15 - 55 . Budapest : Balassi . Tanulmányok a transzcendensről I. Pócs , Éva 2001 Démoni megszállottság és ördögűzés a közép-kelet-európai népi hiedelemrendszerekben [Demonic Possession and Exorcism in the Folk Belief Systems of Central

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Based on written and oral evidence, the present study focuses on Romanian Herodias’ various hypostases: biblical queen, queen of the fairies, sovereign of the căluşari . The canonic, apocryphal and magical writings referring to Herodias are considered as some of the most significant testimonies about this character. Such texts present the image of Herodias as biblical queen who provoked the decapitation of John the Baptist, as it was promoted in 17 th –18 th -century Romanian literature; they also represent an important document for deciding whether a certain apocryphal tradition influenced Romanian folk beliefs related to the malevolent fairies. The study of the oral evidence investigates how Romanian folk beliefs assimilated the story of St John’s decapitation and transformed it into traditional legends and inquires whether these new compositions had an effect on Herodias’ traditional roles, those of queen of the fairies and patroness of the căluşari . Finally, the research attempts to describe how Herodias’ beneficial functions are put into the shade by a powerful Christian opponent.

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The death of Diana, Princess of Wales, on August 31st 1997, led to extraordinary activity by millions of people as they reacted to the news in unexpected and seemingly unprecedented ways.Among the most fascinating phenomena were the many notes which were left for, about and to Diana, at the many ‘shrines’ which sprang up around Britan. This paper will explore the multivalent nature of these notes –the extent to which they reflected folk belief about sainthood, heaven and divinity; the extent to which they were political comment veiled in the conventions of mourning; the extent to which they were either magnifications of common vernacular practice or a new development within it. These remarkable documents were both personal and communal, public and private; t could be argued that they give a unique insight into popular religiosity in Britan at the turn of the Milennium.

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