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Abstract

Studying civil engineers who had a private practice in architecture after the second world war, the notion of network had permit us to create an unity from different individual. Working on fringe of french classical system, those engineers grow different network to act. The apprehension of network can clarify movements of mens, systems and ideas. It permit to overstep the national scope and to apprehend knowledges and knowhows exchanges on the international scale. Notions of network and movement seems to permit a larger investigation and bringing together time, space and disciplines. It could interessed and be applied in the differents ways of art history.

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Across Languages and Cultures
Authors:
Károly Polcz
,
Szvetlana Hamsovszki
,
Erika Huszár
,
Emőke Jámbor
,
Nóra Szigetváry
, and
Marianna Válóczi

formation includes transference, internationalisation and substitution as the most typical translation procedures. The translation procedures identified within interpretative term formation are uniformly referred to as sense-centred translation. This is

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, which confirms another main idea of the author's, “unity in diversity” (p. 74), that is, that diverse approaches lead towards a unified discipline. He notes the increasing degree of internationalization, which promises further substantial progress in IS

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Internationalization and Localization , 7 ( 1/2 ), 95 – 121 . 10.1075/jial.20005.obr PACTE group . ( 2009 ). Results of the validation of the PACTE translation competence model: Acceptability and decision making . Across Languages and Cultures , 10 ( 2 ), 207

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. ( 2020 ). Neural machine translation and the evolution of the localisation sector: Implications for training . The Journal of Internationalization and Localization , 7 ( 1–2 ), 95 – 121 . https://doi.org/10.1075/jial.20005.obr . Persky , A

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De iure, all democratic countries recognize the rights of citizens or immigrants who have a limited or no command of the national language. Nevertheless, de facto, these rights are often neglected, especially in administrative authorities, healthcare services, and even in law courts, where - often literally - matters of life and death are at stake. The paper describes the structure and underlying philosophy of an International Bachelor's degree programme in Court and Community Interpreting that was established at the Department of Technical Communication of the University of Applied Sciences of Magdeburg, Germany (Hochschule Magdeburg-Stendal) in 1999. Modularisation, internationalisation, interdisciplinarity, language-independent training, and the ethics of intercultural mediation are the basic principles of the programme. This means that the programme's purpose is to make the most of scarce resources by means of a modular structure and close cooperation between Faculties and Institutions at home and abroad, training professional intermediaries for a modern multicultural society.

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Due to processes of internationalisation and European integration, countries such as Slovenia have to accommodate many new textual genres, which are either introduced via translation, or written in Slovene for later translation into English. This paper presents an analytical framework developed with this situation in mind and describes how it was applied to a particular translation of a political progress report. The aim was to support the development of a more systematic approach to the production and translation of such texts. The model draws upon discourse analysis, genre analysis and contrastive functional rhetoric, and is compatible with functional approaches to translation. The top-down analysis begins with the discussion of the background to the report and its writing, the participants in the translation process, the training and support provided, and the translation strategies employed. We then go on to consider the broader linguistic and cultural background, including the relevant genre conventions. This is followed by a summary of a detailed analysis of text profile, coherence, cohesion, information structure and register features. The emphasis is on the task facing the reader and whether the communicative purpose of the text is achieved or not.

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Abstract  

Globalisation is decidedly a treacherous word. To a comparatist especially,it offers the shimmering hope of a state of affairs in which there is or mightbe understanding, communication, equivalence among contemporaneous civilisationsthe world over, and human control over the state of the world. But, immediately,a darker reality manifests itself, one which signals uniformisation and lossof control to economic forces defying not only the will of individuals butthe rule of entire states. These forces often identified with multinationalcorporations override the social and environmental interests of these states,a situation which calls for a supranational authority capable of reestablishingor establishing for the first time a world order governed by just and transparentlaws rather than unregulated economic impulses. In other words, globalisationhas the potential to betray its avowed purpose which is the development ofan effective world community. I am not trying here to make a political pointputting blame, for example, on the World Trade organization though personallyI see many reasons to blame it for distorting internationalization. RatherI should like to use the concrete phenomenon of globalisation as a metaphoror correlate for the manner in which the universalizing tendency in literarystudies, and generally in the humanities, can go wrong, when unconsciouslyor just carelessly it imposes certain patterns and suppresses others.

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The “contextualizing” and “internationalizing” of the history of psychology is an ongoing project, however, Central Europe, as a coherent perspective, and the history of Hungarian psychology specifically, is acutely missing in current surveys of international psychology, and more broadly, in “western consciousness”. This paper is an attempt at presenting a comprehensive, socially and politically contextualized framework of the history of Hungarian psychology, from its beginnings until the fall of communism. The paper situates the history of psychology in the history of Hungary since without this broader background Hungarian psychology cannot be treated as a contextualized phenomenon. Reconstructing the history of Hungarian psychology is, at the same time, reclaiming the past, since continuity with, and remembrance of the past was once forcefully obstructed by the communist regime, and the effects proved to be long lasting. Hungarian psychology was, in part, a genuine “extension” of psychology as it developed in Germany and more broadly in Europe, but also a unique and remarkable phenomenon greatly shaped by specific socio-political context. Scholarship on the history of Hungarian psychology is growing fast, but the richness of this history has yet to be more fully explored and appreciated, inside and outside of Hungary.

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References 1. Drezen , E. 2002 . Internationalization of Scientific-technical Terminology . Riga. 2. IITF

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