Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 10 items for :

  • "n-3 fatty acids" x
  • Materials and Applied Sciences x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All

Increasing awareness of the health benefits of n-3 fatty acids has led to studies related to the manipulation of the fatty acid composition of animal products. These fatty acids, especially eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA; C20:5n-3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; C22:6n-3), are abundant in foods of marine origin. Fish consumption is, however, limited by seasonal availability, affordability and consumers' preference. Recent studies on the provision of n-3 fatty acid rich foods have therefore centred on the enrichment of products such as poultry meat through feeding fish oil diets. However, decreased quality (storage and flavour) has been associated with products from poultry fed such diets. Other dietary sources of n-3 fatty acids such as fish meal and plant seed oils result in minor improvement of the quality and low levels of EPA and DHA in the enriched product. Supplementation of high levels of vitamin E or other synthetic antibiotics in diets may increase oxidative stability and hence the storage quality of n-3 fatty acid enriched broiler meat. However, their reported influence on off-flavour is conflicting. Other methods of reducing off-flavour in enriched meat involving the use of processed n-3 PUFA sources although may reduce off-flavour, result in reduced deposition of EPA and DPA. Marine algae (MA) is an attractive source of n-3 fatty acids because it is a primary rich source of DHA and contains naturally occurring carotinoids, which are useful for their antioxidant activity. Investigations into the use of MA and identification of cheaper sources of n-3 PUFA for the enrichment of broiler chicken are needed. In addition, the search for viable methods of reducing off-flavour in n-3 enriched broiler meat should continue. The production of high quality and affordable broiler meat is essential for realising the full benefits associated with the consumption of n-3 fatty acid enriched products.

Restricted access

The n-3 fatty acids advantageously affect human health. Thus, partial substitution of pig backfat with soybean- or flaxseed oils in “Párizsi” (lyoner), with the aim to increase its n-3 fatty acid (FA) content, resulted improved FA profile (n-6/n-3 ratio). Relatively high (9% flaxseed oil) substitution decreased this ratio to the optimum (∼4). This modified FA profile was preserved during 32 storage days. Oil addition influenced fresh surface colour: lightness (L*) increased, redness (a*) decreased in parallel with the increasing oil addition, while only soybean oil increased yellowness (b*). Storage altered the colour slightly. The texture was not systematically altered by oil substitution, while during storage in a vapour permeable casing hardness increased. Considering organoleptic properties, soybean oil improved the extent of spiciness, while the general consumer acceptance was the most favourable (within complemented samples) by 3% flaxseed oil. Increasing vegetable oil levels intensified the taste of spice mixture.

Restricted access

Az n-3 zsírsavak hatása nagy teljesítményű tenyészkocák fontosabb termelési és szaporodásbiológiai paramétereire

Effect of n-3 fatty acids on the performance and reproduction parameters of modern sows

Scientia et Securitas
Author:
Róbert Roszkos

.1080/09712119.2021.2005071 17 Roszkos R., Tóth T., & Mézes M. (2020) Review: practical use of n-3 fatty acids to improve reproduction parameters in the context of modern sow nutrition. Animals, Vol. 10. No. 7. pp. 1141

Open access

In 2009 Hungarian Food Safety Office (HFSO) performed a countrywide representative dietary survey to obtain food consumption data for quantitative food safety risk assessment utilizable in the field of public health nutrition as well. The consumption of foodstuffs, daily energy- and nutrient intakes, nutritional habits and dietary supplement usage of Hungarian population was assessed. The complex system has included three-day dietary record and a food consumption frequency questionnaire. Some anthropometric parameters were also self-recorded. According to the body mass index, a considerable proportion of both the 31–60 years old males (69%) and females (46%) were overweight or obese. The energy intake of the Hungarian adult population is slightly exceeds the recommendation. The intake of proteins is satisfactory in general. The average intake of total fats is very high (36.1–38.9 energy percent), and the fatty acid composition — mostly the ratio of n-6/n-3 fatty acids — is unfavourable, but the fatty acid pattern regarding saturated- (SFA), mono- (MUFA) and polyunsaturated (PUFA) fatty acid ratio shows favourable tendency. The proportion of complex carbohydrates within the intake of energy providing macronutrients is far lower than the optimal level, but it is a positive finding that added sugar intake is below the outmost recommendation. The average daily cholesterol intake is high (males: 469 mg, females: 335 mg), whilst the dietary fibre intake is lower than the recommended. The article provides data on alcohol, caffeine and fibre consumption, too.

Restricted access

The fatty acid composition of wild sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax L.) and gilthead sea bream (Sparus auratus L.) were compared with gas chromatography. These two species are widely cultivated in Europe and represent a significant portion of consumed fish in the region. The aim of the present work was to compare the nutritional value of fatty acids in the flesh of wild sea bass and sea bream. Significant differences were observed in the saturated and poly-unsaturated fatty acid content. The presence of lauric, myristic and palmitic acids in the flesh of sea bream in quantities far exceeding those in sea bass make sea bream less suitable for preventing cardiovascular diseases. The poly-unsaturated n-3 fatty acids with both anti-atherogenetic and anti-inflammatory action in sea bass surpass those of sea bream by a total of 30%. Sea bass also contains 60% more C22:6n-3. Compared to sea bream, sea bass appears to be more suitable for the diet of people suffering from cardiac diseases, angiopathy, inflammations and Alzheimer’s disease.

Restricted access

The influence of seasonal variations on the chemical composition and composition of fatty acids in five commercially important freshwater fish species from the Danube: white bream, bream, vimba, zope, and Prussian carp, during May, July and September was determined. Changes in the chemical composition of meat of all examined species had the same tendencies. Water and protein content in the meat decreased, while fat content increased. The most frequent fatty acids in the meat of all the examined fish were the following: 18:1 n-9 (oleic), 16:0 (palmitic), 16:1 (palmitoleic), 18:2 n-6 (linoleic), 20:1 (eicosenoic), 20:5 n-3 eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), 20:4 n-6 arachidonic acid and 22:6 n-3 docosahexaeonic acid (DHA). The content of saturated fatty acids (SFA) ranged from 25.03% to 32.43% and displayed a tendency to increase during the observed period. The total content of the n-6 group in the meat of Prussian carp was higher than in other species, which was probably a consequence of specific diet. The total content of n-3 fatty acids in the meat of white bream, bream, vimba and zope was the highest in May, and it declined during July-September. We can conclude that the meat of white bream and vimba contains high nutritional values in terms of EPA and DHA content. The n-3/n-6 ratio was also very favourable: 0.9 to 2.0 in the meat of white bream, bream, vimba and zope, with a clear downward tendency in the observed period.

Restricted access
Acta Alimentaria
Authors:
A. Lugasi
,
K. Neszlényi
,
J. Hóvári
,
K. V. Lebovics
,
A. Hermán
,
T. Ács
,
J. Gundel
, and
I. Bodó

Fat content and fatty acid composition were investigated in Musculus gluteus medius of pigs from two different breeds: traditional Hungarian Mangalica and a crossbreed of Hungarian Large White and Dutch Landrace. Animals of both varieties were divided into two groups and were kept individually on control or experimental mixtures of feeds. Experimental feed contained significantly higher amount of linoleic and linolenic acid than the control one. Significantly higher fat content was detected in meat of Mangalica pigs kept on both feed mixtures than in those of crossbred. The proportion of saturated fatty acids was nearly the same in the meat of both genotypes. More monounsaturated fatty acids were detected in Mangalica meat than in crossbred ones expressed in percent of total fatty acids and absolute amount, as well. As a result of experimental diet, percentage and absolute amount of oleic acid decreased significantly in both genotypes. Less polyunsaturated fatty acids expressed as percent of total acids were observed in the muscle of Mangalica than in those of crossbred ones. Absolute amount and the proportion of total polyunsaturated fatty acids (especially linoleic and linolenic acids) increased significantly as a result experimental diets. The ratio of n-6 and n-3 fatty acids changed beneficially in both genotypes consuming a diet containing 20% full-fat soy from 13.6:1 to 10.0:1 in Mangalica and from 15.4:1 to 10.3:1 in crossbred genotype. According to present results, it has became clear that the fatty acid composition of the meat of the traditional Hungarian Mangalica can be successfully modified by the diet, and this manipulation can make the meat healthier in spite of its high fat content.

Restricted access

. The total amount of n-3 and n-6 fatty acids and their ratio in the fillets of the two investigated groups at spring, summer, and autumn harvests are indicated in Table 7 . Fish meat is one of the vital sources of n-3 fatty acids in human nutrition

Open access
Acta Alimentaria
Authors:
C.V. Raimundi
,
B.C. Scopel
,
A.N. Ito
,
A.A.L. Tribst
,
G.A.R. Sehn
,
D. Cavalheiro
, and
E. Rigo

1 Introduction Sheep milk has a higher content of proteins, lipids, minerals, vitamins, conjugated linolenic acid, short and medium-chain fatty acids, and n-3 fatty acids compared to bovine milk or goat milk, favouring the manufacture of dairy

Restricted access

habits, geographic region, obesity ( Butts et al., 2018 ). Lindholm et al. (2013) found that obese mothers' milk contained fewer n-3 fatty acids than normal weight mothers' milk. This resulted in a 40% higher n-6/n-3 ratio in breast milk from obese

Open access