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In the present note three — possibly corrupt — places in the Catullus’ poems are discussed: 10. 27, 14. 14 and 40. 1. Two old conjectures are defended for the first two, and a new proposal is made for the last one, all based on the common palaeographical ground, inferred from the MSS error in 40. 1.

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Although the East Old Turkic runiform inscriptions were deciphered already in 1893 by Thomsen (1896), the East European runiform fragments still present a mystery: we do not exactly know whom they belong to, which language(s) they represent, etc. During the last hundred years several attempts have been made to decipher them but nobody could provide a widely acceptable interpretation. This is because of the very nature of the findings: they are few in number and short in length. Accordingly, there is a consensus among the competent scholars that the decipherment raises serious difficulties which cannot be solved for the time being.It is, however, our primary task to document and catalogue every new finding as precisely as possible in the hope that the decipherment will one day be possible.The present article will document and analyse hitherto unknown runiform inscriptions carved into two bone plates for the grip of a bow found in a late Avar cemetery at Kiskundorozsma in South-East Hungary. The article is divided into two parts: first, an archaeological analysis with radiocarbon and thermoluminescence dating, second, a palaeographical analysis with the emphasis on methodology.

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In this paper the authors publish a new sarcophagus from Tatabánya found in 1989. The funerary inscription was erected to a tesserarius who served in the legio I adiutrix in Brigetio and other living members of the family by his half-brother. Based on the names the stemma of the family can be restored. The tesserarius was depicted on the frontal side with the hastile of the optiones in his hand. Based on the text, the palaeography and the rich decorated sarcophagus, it can be dated to the 2nd half of the 3rd century and it was made in a local workshop in Brigetio.

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Our epigraphic terminology usually applies the name of cursive script to every kind of scratched inscriptions, although they were written in significantly different styles. Apart from the strange terminology, the major problems in the palaeography of Roman scratches are those of datation, and of the question: whom are those inscriptions to be connected with? The writing manner which might be called really cursive appears mostly on bricks and the tabulae ceratae; partially cursive texts occur 1) in the handwriting of more skilled writers, 2) in the writing of some special letters, most of all ‖, 3) when copying cursive scripts. It is the reason why functionally illiterate stone-cutters produce ununderstandable inscriptions, misinterpretating the cursive models. With some care, such misinterpretations can be explained and thus the meaningless texts reconstructed.

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.), Lupa 2782 (inv.n. MNM 56.1911.3.=62.54.1.) (photo: O. Harl) Palaeography of individual letters: v. 1: – C: Slightly recurving terminals, thick letter with a nigh 1:1 proportion. Its serifs extend to both directions in obtuse angles. – R: Classic wide

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