Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 41 items for :

  • "regression" x
  • Arts and Humanities x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All

Poetics of infinite regress

Narrative abrogation in Zola’s Nana

Neohelicon
Author:
R.-L. Barnett

Abstract  

Within the tangled skein of Zola’s Nana, malady—metaphysical and metaphorical—yields but violated debris: a disassemblage of annexed marginalia, bits of flesh, disinherited, as it were, and subsisting in the absence of all signifying matter. So with discourse. It, likewise, transpires as a breed of involuted play, a repository of ill-defined wantingness, an interstice, an illusion, oxymoron, annulation, oneiric absence—until it slakes perniciously into silence. To the extent that readability (the infamous “lisible”) is constructed largely upon some brand of referential chain (even in its post-modern, intratextual demeanors), the disintegration of the novel’s nuclear substance un-does, in a very real sense, any brand of integrality. As the inexorable “virus” eviscerates and strips away the actrice, the theater, the stage, the visage of Venus, the play, the script, the auto-referentiality of narcissistic glances, the vituperative glare of those “perdu[s] derrière les jupes,” in sum, the very matter of the exposé (énoncé and énonciation), we, as readers, are extradited to the margins of discourse, left at an end, at the end with none but the somatic vestiges of Zola’s bloat queen, whose deleted marrow is the only marrow that there is, usurping the text and, ultimately, the contours of its own ravaged frame. Yet there lurks, all else effaced, this “monstre de l’Écriture, lubrique, sentant la fauve”: Zola’s epithetic turn of phrase, the genitive pitting of beastliness and textliness, significantly repeals difference and proffers a conjunctive vision of word and world withered.

Restricted access

répulsive de la pire vie que l’homme puisse mener. Les zoophytes représentent alors un horizon possible de régression à garder à l’esprit, et non, comme chez Jean Philopon, un certain stade, une étape de la formation de l’homme qui sera nécessairement

Open access

variables of interest. A multiple linear regression to establish an explanatory model of the linear relationship between the explanatory (independent) variables and the response (dependent) variable, was also conducted. All data were analysed using the

Restricted access

means of a regression analysis. This approach is in part inspired by Kruger and van Rooy (2018), who use the same approach to study register variation in various constrained varieties of written English. 4.3.1 Preprocessing The TreeTagger-based 11

Restricted access

overall processing at the sentence or text level (e.g., Seeber & Kerzel, 2012 ; Shreve, Lacruz, & Angelone, 2010 ). Word-based measures, such as first fixation duration (FFD), regression count, and regression path duration (RPD), are informative about

Restricted access

quantitative data were then analysed using a binary logistic regression model with CM as the sole independent variable. To assess the model's performance and mitigate the risk of overfitting or selection bias, the study employed Receiver Operating

Restricted access

coefficients. Multivariate stepwise regression analysis was then utilized to test the predictive effect of personality hardiness on interpreting performance. Finally, three-stepped regression analysis was adopted to test the mediating effect of interpreting

Restricted access

multicollinearity, normality, linearity, homoscedasticity were met for all regressions. Table 3 summarizes the descriptive statistics for all variables in the four language varieties. Table 3. Descriptive statistics for MSL, text size, MDD and DDir (head

Restricted access

regression models were generated using the non-standardised, “raw” data points of the given predictor. The inflection points (where the predicted probability of a voiced response is 0.5) reported in these plots were calculated using the following formula: ln

Open access

. Balint , Michael ( 1959 ). Thrills and Regressions . Hogarth Press , London

Open access