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Sustainable consumption and production

An effort to reconcile the determinants of environmental impact

Society and Economy
Authors:
Stefano Pogutz
and
Valerio Micale

Technology. Human Ecology Review 1: 277–300. Rosa E. Rethinking the Environmental Impacts of Population, Affluence and Technology Human Ecology Review

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Acta Oeconomica
Authors:
Patricio Pérez
,
Marta Bengoa
, and
Adolfo Fernández

2001 91 12 17 Benhabib, J. — Spiegel, M. (2005): Human Capital and Technology Diffusion. In: Aghion, P. — Durlauf, S

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of world’s human resources of science and technology . Science and Technology of China BBS , ( 2 ), 131 – 142 . Wang , F. and Du , Y-P. ( 2008 ). The current situation of the

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What managers can learn from knowledge intensive technology startups? •

Exploring the skillset for developing adaptive organizational learning capabilities of a successful start-up enterprise in management education

Society and Economy
Authors:
Diána Dóra Beke
,
Andrea Sólyom
, and
Andrea Juhászné Klér

, and that university students, studying management, can learn a lot from startups ( Daze 2021 ). This paper proposes a framework for studying the organizational learning patterns and adaptive entrepreneurial skillset of knowledge-intensive technology

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/smes/access-to-markets/internationalisation_en, accessed 12/03/2017. EY ( 2016 ): Medical Technology Report 2016. http://www.ey.com/Publication/vwLUAssets/eypulse-of-the-industry-2016/$FILE/ey-pulse-of-the-industry-2016.pdf, accessed 12

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Krugman, P. (1986): A “Technology Gap” Model of International Trade. In: Jungenfelt, K. — Hague, D. (eds.): Structural Adjustment in Advanced Economies . Basingstoke: Macmillan, pp. 35–48. Krugman P

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into an energy carrier (“X”) ( Bofinger 2022 ). This technology allows surplus production of electricity to be stored for later use while at the same time potentially minimising CO 2 emissions. The contribution of gas generated from surplus renewable

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Following the big transformations of the 1990s, enterprise structure and technological level seem to have become stabilised in Hungary. Under these circumstances it is especially interesting to identify the elements responsible for competitiveness in general, and the role technology plays in development in particular, according to managers experienced in production and marketing. This empirical study - based on in-depth interviews and field research - summarises characteristics of the technological level in the sectors examined, role of technology and labour in production, effects of foreign direct investment, relations between competition and firm-level factors determining competitiveness, and concludes by summing up those most frequently mentioned proposals that should be incorporated into economic policy according to managers. Main findings indicate that more qualified, more intensive and cheaper labour can be substituted for high technology. The competitiveness of an enterprise is not determined by technology alone, but rather by a combination of technology, the parameters of available labour and the costs of investment increasing productivity. The insufficiency of inter-company relations, together with a shortage of available assets necessary for investment constitute the major threat undermining the competitiveness of enterprises in present-day Hungary.

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As readily proven by the Credit Crunch and the consequent 2008 Global Financial Crisis, our perception of what law and regulation can achieve to forestall financial calamities and to protect the integrity of the system was seriously mistaken. Besides the misjudged risks generated by financial innovation as well as financial pathology and general incomprehension of finance as such, two further misconceptions are of interdisciplinary nature. On the one hand, the risk-type that was brought to the surface by the Credit Crunch was systemic risk; a risk of complexity and dimensions that was corollary only to the Great Depression erupting in 1929. From a legal perspective, this meant unprecedented interpenetration of various branches of law, from mortgage and corporate to securities law. The central piece in the puzzle – asset securitization – was a synergic product of these. The first conclusion the paper draws is that in the light of this there is a need for a new legal discipline – the law of finance – that would spread over all these branches of law (internal inter-disciplinarity). On the other hand, both the Credit Crunch as well as the subsequent developments on financial markets show that understanding finance and the risks inherent to it are not only becoming increasingly problematic (not only for lawyers) but that some of the risks are unidentifiable (“unknown unknowns”). Finance is inherently complex, yet further exacerbating factors are the growing presence of technology, mathematization of finance (and economics) and the possible synergic effects of various, often seemingly not linked, financial products. The second claim this paper makes consequently is that legal scholarship should face, comprehend and reckon with the roles other disciplines increasingly play in finance (external inter-disciplinarity) and the fundamentally altered nature of finance. Subscribing to the conclusion – on an abstract and theoretical level – that the looming crises should be perceived as multi-disciplinary phenomena that as such require multi-disciplinary panacea and more cooperation from the affected disciplines would be easy. In reality, however, little seems to have changed. Suffice to take a look at law school curricula to realize that actually few have recipes for such seemingly simple but practical questions as how to teach the law of finance, especially where consensus has not been reached even on whether teach it at all. Equally heavy dilemmas are already presented for regulators or judges when deciding on issues from the realms of finance law.

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point to an array of capabilities indispensable for achieving the expected return on investments in digital manufacturing technologies (DMT). Apart from leadership and change in management capabilities, profiting from digitalisation requires the

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