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World History, Global History, Big History

Some remarks on terminology and concepts in relation to history curricula and textbooks

Hungarian Educational Research Journal
Author:
Susanne Popp

that influences the historical thinking of teachers and students. Besides the disciplinary allocation, of course, the national traditions of academic disciplines, with their respective historical and/or pedagogical terminologies, theories, and methods

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definitions throughout the African continent. Thereupon the author provides an interesting discussion on terminology. Although he uses the concept of shadow education, he recognizes that the term is not used worldwide and is not always easy to translate from

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and the legal framework. In this context, the differentiation between the concepts of parenting and cooperation is also emphasised. The authors consistently use thorough and precise terminology and attempt to present the concepts precisely. This is

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discipline, from the aspect of terminology. She demonstrates that the interpretation and use of a number of disciplinary concepts vary significantly in international practice. Her paper focuses on the different forms in which World History , as a historical

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Introduction This paper attempts to offer an insight into the terminology of gamification, although it needs to be pointed out that the technical terms gamified , gamification and game-enhanced are often used interchangeably in research and

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in detail such as a comparison of Gardner's use of terminology to that of others', changes in motivation concerning the individual learner, the learner's cognition, the macro-perspective, and a final snapshot on Norton's use of Gardner's model. In the

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knowledge in question may either be systematically organised as a discipline or only loosely integrated in a less formal way. The first alternative may be called ‘specialised’, following Hordern’s terminology, and the second may accordingly be referred to as

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social and economic outcomes, even if this involves some degree of cultural homogenisation. These issues are returned to in the conclusion. Background and terminology In this section, I provide a brief overview of the

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divided into main parts describing the conceptualization and reflecting on the evolution of new processes in education, applying the Arena as a terminology of the “field of play”, a classroom with certain teaching and learning methods. Davis starts her

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from methodological terminology and is replaced by 'learning' entirely. This not only refers specifically to the methodological aspect, but also reflects the emphasis of constructivist pedagogy: learning takes over the central role from teaching

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