Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 53 items for :

  • "textural properties" x
  • Biology and Life Sciences x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All

19 195 201 Wang, L., Flores, R.A. 1999. Effect of different wheat classes and their flour milling streams on textural properties of flour tortillas

Restricted access

The fat content of Bologna-type turkey sausages was partially replaced with pea fiber or potato starch. Textural properties of full fat turkey sausage were mainly restored in sausages when fat was partially replaced with some levels of pea fiber (0.6, 1.2%) or potato starch (1.9%). Authors observed significant correlation (P<0.01) between instrumentally measured values of hardness and chewiness and sensory ratings of low fat sausages.

Restricted access

The aim of the work was to develop a method to evaluate the effect of bread improver dosage on bread crumb texture. Standard breads were prepared to get different crumb structures when bread improver was added to the flour in a concentrate of 0.2%, 0.4% and 0.6%. The additive used in the experiments contains lecithin, ascorbic acid and alpha-amylase. Rheological tests and image analysis were performed to predict the effect of the additive. Hardness, chewiness, gumminess, cohesiveness and springiness were determined by rheological method. The rheological properties neither separately nor combined were able to discriminate the different bread crumb groups. Image processing method was developed to determine the ratio of dark to light area of the images taken of the bread slices. It was concluded that both rheological and visual parameters should be taken into account to characterize bread crumb texture.

Restricted access

not only provides the sweetness of the product, especially in foods, but is also an essential ingredient for the formation of its rheological and textural properties ( Zahn et al., 2013 ). In addition, fat provides various advantages such as higher

Restricted access

The aim of the current paper was to elucidate the influence of temperature and time on acrylamide formation and physico-chemical characteristics of bread. Additionally, the effect of asparaginase addition to bran was evaluated. With increasing baking time and temperature, the amount of acrylamide (µg kg−1) increased. The results indicated that the acrylamide concentration in treated samples with asparaginase was significantly less than those without asparaginase treatment. Based on Pearson’ test, it was found that there was a significant correlation between baking temperature and acrylamide concentration (R=0.99, P=0.025; and R=0.98, P=0.026 for the samples prepared by baking for 2.5 min and 3 min, respectively). The firmness of bread samples increased with increasing baking temperature (P&gt;0.05), while asparaginase addition did not significant affect the textural characteristics of the final product. Breads baked at 320 °C for 3 min were more acceptable by the sensory panel in terms of their texture and chewiness, whereas the samples baked at 370 °C for 2.5 min had the lowest score in comparison to other evaluated samples.

Restricted access

confectionary systems. Here, we investigated differences in the texture properties, the viscosity and thermal properties of the blends. Materials and methods Commercial sugar (sucrose), stevia and xylitol were used in this study. Palm oil was purchased from

Open access
Acta Alimentaria
Authors: P. Penksza, R. sárosi, R. Juhász, K. Manninger-kóczán, B. Szabó-Nótin, L. Szakács, and J. Barta

Kip, P., Meyer, D. & Jellema, R.H. (2006): Inulins improve sensoric and textural properties of low-fat yoghurts. Int. Dairy J., 16, 1098–1103. Jellema R.H. Inulins improve

Restricted access

Introduction Hazelnut spreads are considered as a complex multiphase system, which contain different dispersed solid particulars and a continuous fat phase ( Glicerina et al., 2013 ). The physical attributes such as textural properties, viscosity

Open access

.S. , Sekhon , K.S. 2005 . Physicochemical, cooking and textural properties of milled rice from different Indian rice cultivars . Food Chem. 89 : 253 – 259 . Singh , N. , Kaur

Restricted access

Potato wedges were deep, shallow, and par-fried in soybean, sesame, and mustard oils using a laboratory formulated citric acid based antioxidant. The wedges were stored at –18 °C for 10, 20, 30, and 40 days. The quality of the wedges was assessed by subjective method (sensory analysis) and objective method (texture studies). Fuzzy logic was applied as a tool to analyze the linguistic data of subjective evaluation. Objective evaluation was conducted by studies on hardness, shear modulus and shear energy of the wedges. The wedges with highest defuzzified scores (obtained by sensory evaluation) and minimum changes in textural properties (P<0.05) were obtained in par-fried soybean oil (after 40 days storage) and in deep fried sesame and mustard oils (both after 30 days storage). The ranking of fried wedges (in the antioxidant administered oils) based on defuzzified scores after 40 days were: sesame > mustard > soybean (deep fry), mustard > soybean > sesame (shallow fry) and soybean > mustard > sesame (par-fry).

Restricted access