Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 7 of 7 items for :

  • "translation skills" x
  • Arts and Humanities x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All

of the skills sought by employers in Hong Kong. The employers were satisfied with local graduates' translation skills and Chinese-language competence, but they were concerned about poor English-language skills, insufficient area knowledge and

Restricted access

that are directly related to the translation skill (p. 161). The diversity of production conditions can only be handled in the framework of a situated, distributed and extended (SDE) account of expertise where the definition of expertise must be domain

Restricted access

://makrprocess.com/workflow/2013/12/5/how-the-agency-works-20 [ Accessed 21 Nov 2022 ]. Calvo , E. ( 2015 ). Scaffolding translation skills through situated training approaches: Progressive and reflective methods . The Interpreter and Translator Trainer , 9 ( 3 ), 306

Restricted access

This paper begins with the following question: What is the relation between memory and translation? If a computer, which can be given a very large amount of memory, stored millions and millions of documents and their human translations would that computer then be able to translate just like a human? The paper then explores a limitation to automatic translation based on memory. This limitation is explained in terms of the Black Box Myth of translation. However, despite this limitation, the usefulness of computers is explored as productivity tools for human translators. Then the study asks what properties might be needed in a computer, besides memory, in order to allow it to translate like a human and how to tell whether a computer has acquired human translation skills. A variation of the Turing Test is proposed as a diagnostic, along with various intermediate translation-based tests for theories of meaning. The paper ends with some philosophical speculation about the possible role of free will in language, including translation, and how a certain position on this question might influence future studies in the area of translation and cognition.

Restricted access

The article applies to translation some ideas from critical discourse analysis and discusses the potential effects of translational solutions on the ideological content of texts in the light of a small-scale study on student translations. Ideology refers here to the ways in which linguistic choices made by the writer or translator of a text, first, create a particular perspective on the events portrayed, second, may reflect the writer's opinions and attitudes, and third, may be used to influence readers' opinions. Particular linguistic structures, such as vocabulary, finite and nonfinite constructions, active and passive forms, and grammatical metaphors, can be seen as conscious or unconscious strategies which realise ideological meanings. In translation, ideologically motivated linguistic structures of a source text may be manipulated either unintentionally because of insufficient language and/or translation skills or lacking knowledge of the relationship between language and ideology, or intentionally owing to translation norms, requirements of the translation commission or the translator's own attitudes towards the source text subject. The analysis of Finnish translations of English magazine articles made by translation students focused on explicitating and implicitating translation strategies. Implicitation was found to be much more frequent than explicitation. Explicitation included, for instance, replacing a source-text nominalisation with a Finnish verb phrase and making clausal relations more explicit by adding connectives to the texts. Implicitation involved turning verb phrases into nominalisations and complete relative clauses into complex premodified noun phrases. These strategies changed the viewpoints and occasionally even modified the opinions expressed by the source-text writers. The students' non-systematic application of opposite strategies suggests that source text manipulation was mainly caused by insufficient skills and knowledge rather than ideological motivations.

Restricted access

. Király, D. C. 1990. Towards a Systematic Approach to Translation Skills Instruction. Unpublished doctoral dissertation. Ann Arbor: University Microfilms International. Király, D. C. 1995. Pathways to Translation

Restricted access

the typical challenges in L2 learning would help improve learners' writing and translating skills. Pragmatically, translationese-interlanguage differentiation will help increase the public interest in ITr, which has always been underestimated. While

Restricted access