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Dr. Barnabás Nagy

(1921–2020), a naturalist, orthopterologist, agrozoologist and forward-looking ecologist covered a rich scientific career. In commemoration of his significant contribution to entomology, we attempt to shed some light on a selection of his achievements. While devoted to his chosen insect order, Orthoptera, he was sensitive also to problems coming from everyday’s practice in controlling pests in agriculture. Consequently, he dealt with various pest species, belonging to a variety of insect taxa (Coleoptera, Lepidoptera, Hymenoptera). He always put the actual problem in ecological context. This may have helped him to recognize the need for an ecological approach in plant protection and to develop the pioneering concept of biological / ecological pest management, published in Hungarian, as early as in 1957. When arguing for his concept, he criticized the surplus usages of toxic pesticides and provided guidelines for facilitating the beneficial activity of the natural enemies of pests. This way he prepared the way for integrated pest management (IPM), preceding the international mainstream of his age. He held an active part in the International Organization for Biological Control (IOBC), as a founder of the International Working Group of Ostrinia (IWGO), and was the Head of the Department of Zoology of the Plant Protection Institute, Budapest, Hungary. He held several positions in the Hungarian Entomological Society (President, vice-President, Secretary, committee member), to that society he was engaged for 80 years. Here we cite only some of his most important, original entomological papers. He regularly published also in journals for popular science and gave lectures for the young generations of entomologists.

Curriculum vitae in a nutshell

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. Kokalis-Burelle , N. and Rodríguez-Kábana , R. ( 2006 ): Allelochemicals as biopesticides for management of plant-parasitic nematodes . In: K. G. Inderjit and Mukerji (eds): Allelochemicals: Biological Control of Plant Pathogens and Diseases

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: Hypocreales) in combination with three diatomaceous earth formulations against Sitophilus granarius (L.) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) . Biological Control , 40 ( 3 ): 411 – 416 . 10.1016/j.biocontrol.2006.12.001 Barbarin , A.M. , Bellicanta , G

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of phytoseiid mites (Acari: Phytoseiidae) and implications for biological control strategies . Systematic and Applied Acarology , 18 , 297 – 321 . 10.11158/saa.18.4.1 Mo , Y ., Lai , Y ., Zhao , Y.-Y . and Wang , G.-Q . ( 2017 ): One new

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– 126 . Lester , P.J. and R. Harmsen . 2002 . Functional and numerical responses do not always indicate the most effective predator for biological control: an analysis of two

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fungal plant pathogens, a variety of mechanisms contributes to the biocontrol activity of microbes. Cell-wall-degrading enzymes such as β-1, 3-glucanases, cellulases, proteases, and chitinases are involved in antagonistic activity of some biological

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Acta Alimentaria
Authors: M.Y. Jiang, Z.R. Wang, K.W. Chen, J.Q. Kan, K.T. Wang, Zs. Zalán, F. Hegyi, K. Takács, and M.Y. Du

, 13 – 20 . Wang , K.T. , Jin , P. , Cao , S. , Rui , H.J. & Zheng , Y.H. ( 2011 ): Biological control of green mould decay in postharvest

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shown that in addition to pure glycerol, this genus is able to grow and produce active metabolites in medium containing waste glycerol as well ( ĆiriĆ et al., 2012 ; Dodd et al., 2018 ). Usage of microorganisms in biological control of plant pathogens

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the use of additional insecticides is environmentally undesirable, biological control methods have also become significant. The classic solution of this is to import and spread natural enemies from their North American origins. A more easily available

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Biological control – as an alternative method – has a great importance in sustainable food production ( Bale et al., 2008 ) as well as in in-farm application ( Gálvez et al., 2010 ). It appears to be a good solution to eliminate foodborne pathogenic

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