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Abstract

Water availability is one of the major physiological factors influencing plant growth and development. An assessment study has been done at the Szent István University, Gödöllő to evaluate and identify the water footprint of protein yield of field crop species. Twelve field crop species (Sugar beet Beta vulgaris, spring and winter barley Hordeum vulgare, winter wheat Triticum aestivum, maize Zea mays, sunflower Helianthus annuus, peas Pisum sativum, potato Solanum tuberosum, alfalfa Medicago sativa, oilseed rape Brassica napus, rye Secale cereale and oats Avena sativa) were involved in the study. Evapotranspiration patterns of the crops studied have been identified by the regular agroclimatology methodology and physiologically reliable protein ranges within crop yields were evaluated.

The results obtained suggest, that water footprint of cereals proved to be the lowest, however maize values were highly affected by the high variability of protein yield. Oilseed crops had considerably high protein yield with medium water efficiency. Alfalfa, potato and sugar beet water footprints were in accordance with their evapotranspiration patterns.

Protein based water footprint assessment seems to be more applicable in crop species evaluations than that of yield based methodologies.

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protein content of this bean is high (20–28%) and one of the best source for iron mineral (155 mg/100 g bean) ( Kay, 1979 ). The amount of protein in this bean does not differ too much with other high-protein beans such as soybean. Lablab bean has a very

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protein content of wheat crops has important impacts on their nutritional quality for humansand livestock and on their functional properties in food processing. ( Shewry & Halford, 2002 ). Economic value of winter wheat is affected by the genotype

Open access

Increasing the protein and antioxidant content of food products is a constant challenge amongst researchers. Dried pasta products are popular amongst all groups of society. The most important factor in pasta processing is the quality of the flour. Millet (Panicum miliaceum) flour has high nutritional value, enriching it with cricket (Gryllus bimaculatus) flour is good choice to increase the quality of protein composition and antioxidant properties of products. Flour mixtures of millet and insect flours (5% and 10%) were analysed after mixing and pasta processing. Addition of wheat gluten improved both texture and nutrition value of pasta products. Total polyphenol content, antioxidant capacity, total protein content, free and total amino acid composition were studied. Quality analysis of dried pasta products were carried out according to Hungarian standards. Data was analysed with Kruskal-Wallis test, Dunn's pair-wise post hoc test was used with Bonferroni correction. The correlation was determined by Spearman's rank. Addition of cricket flour modified the pH, acid value, moisture content, and colour of the samples, these changes lasted during storage. Enrichment could increase the total phenol content significantly even at the low level of 10%. Heat treatment during pasta processing had negative effect on the antioxidant capacity except at higher cricket flour contents. Cricket flour's high protein content proportionately increased millet flour's, thus pasta products'. Dried pasta products passed all quality norms. Enrichment of millet flour with cricket flour is favourable from both nutritional and quality aspects.

Open access
Acta Veterinaria Hungarica
Authors: Viktor Jurkovich, Barbara Bognár, Krisztián Balogh, Mária Kovács-Weber, Kinga Fornyos, Rubina Tünde Szabó, Péter Kovács, László Könyves, and Miklós Mézes

Milk yield, milk ingredients, health and other, production-related parameters of subclinically infected, Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP-) shedding (positive faecal PCR, n = 20) and non-shedding (negative faecal PCR, n = 10) dairy cows were compared in the period from 10 days prepartum to 120 days postpartum. Body condition, rumen fill and faeces scores were lower in the MAP-shedding cows. There was no significant difference in plasma or urine metabolic parameters between the groups. Milk yield and lactose content tended to be lower (P = 0.074 and 0.077, respectively), somatic cell count tended to be higher (P = 0.097), while milk fat content was significantly higher (P = 0.006) in MAP-shedding cows than in the controls. Milk protein content did not differ between the groups. All other health and production parameters [number of reproductive tract treatments, number of udder treatments, number of artificial inseminations (AIs), calving interval, and service period] were significantly better in the control group. It is concluded that MAP infection, even in a subclinical form, has a significant impact on some production and health parameters of dairy cows.

Open access

The primary purpose of these researches was to optimize single-cell protein (SCP) production process using Saccharomyces cerevisiae NCAIM Y.00200 and Kluyveromyces marxianus DSM 4908 strain, and then to analyse the changes in yield of single-cell protein final product using vitamin supplementation. To determine these values, the total sugar content of the fermentation medium, and the protein content of the yeast was determined. During our work, a particular attention was paid to the change of sugar content and yeast protein quantity. Besides, yield (Yx/s) values, typical of the whole fermentation, were also measured. Protein yield, as the final product of fermentation, featured the efficiency of our work. The results of our optimized trial settings that were considered as control, using S. cerevisiae NCAIM Y.00200 and K. marxianus DSM 4908 strains, were compared with the results of vitamin-supplemented fermentation processes. On this basis, we can say that during our trials vitamin supplementation did not influence the final product yield of processes. The counted protein yields during fermentation were between 0.4–0.7 g g−1.

Open access
Cereal Research Communications
Authors: W.T. Xue, A. Gianinetti, R. Wang, Z.J. Zhan, J. Yan, Y. Jiang, T. Fahima, G. Zhao, and J.P. Cheng

Crop seeds are the main staples in human diet, especially in undeveloped countries. In any case, the diet needs to be rich not only in macro-nutrients like carbohydrates and protein, but also in micro-nutrients. Nevertheless, both the macro- and micro-nutrients presented in seeds largely vary in consequence of field and environment conditions. In this research, 60 lines of a barley RILs population segregating for the SSR marker Hvm74, which is genetically linked to the GPC (grain protein content) locus (HvNAM-1), were studied in 4 environments (two growing years and two field managements) by carrying out a comprehensive profile of seed macro- (starch, total nitrogen and total soluble protein) and micro-nutrients (phytate, phenolics, flavonoids, Pi, Zn and Fe). Under field conditions, all the components were largely affected by the environment, but TN (total nitrogen) exhibited high genotype contribution, while micro-nutrients displayed higher genotype × environments interactions (GEI) than macro-nutrients. In order to approach the effects of carbon-nitrogen (C–N) balance on other seed components, two C/N ratios were calculated: C/TN (CNR1) and C/TSP (CNR2). CNR2 exhibited stronger negative correlations with all micro-nutrients. Hence, the significant GEI and its negative relationships with CNR2 highlighted the different characters of micro-nutrients in barley seeds.

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References A yerza , R. & C oates , W. ( 2011 ): Protein content, oil content and fatty acid profiles as potential criteria to determine the origin of commercially grown

Open access
Orvosi Hetilap
Authors: Alíz Erdélyi-Sipos, Krisztina Badacsonyiné Kassai, Jolán Kubányi, Zsuzsanna Szűcs, Lajos Biró, and L. Bence Raposa

: 855–860. 20 Weber M, Grote V, Closa-Monasterolo R, et al. Lower protein content in infant formula reduces BMI and obesity risk at school age: follow-up of a randomized trial

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Acta Veterinaria Hungarica
Authors: Orsolya Kutasi, Orsolya Fehér, Sára Sárdi, Nándor Balogh, Anna Nagy, Leticia Moravszki, Emese Bódai, and Ottó Szenci

min after collection and another sample from each horse was air-dried after cytocentrifugation and kept for further evaluation. Cytological analysis was performed within 6 h in all cases. Protein content was measured using an ultrasensitive method

Open access