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protein content of wheat crops has important impacts on their nutritional quality for humansand livestock and on their functional properties in food processing. ( Shewry & Halford, 2002 ). Economic value of winter wheat is affected by the genotype

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Increasing the protein and antioxidant content of food products is a constant challenge amongst researchers. Dried pasta products are popular amongst all groups of society. The most important factor in pasta processing is the quality of the flour. Millet (Panicum miliaceum) flour has high nutritional value, enriching it with cricket (Gryllus bimaculatus) flour is good choice to increase the quality of protein composition and antioxidant properties of products. Flour mixtures of millet and insect flours (5% and 10%) were analysed after mixing and pasta processing. Addition of wheat gluten improved both texture and nutrition value of pasta products. Total polyphenol content, antioxidant capacity, total protein content, free and total amino acid composition were studied. Quality analysis of dried pasta products were carried out according to Hungarian standards. Data was analysed with Kruskal-Wallis test, Dunn's pair-wise post hoc test was used with Bonferroni correction. The correlation was determined by Spearman's rank. Addition of cricket flour modified the pH, acid value, moisture content, and colour of the samples, these changes lasted during storage. Enrichment could increase the total phenol content significantly even at the low level of 10%. Heat treatment during pasta processing had negative effect on the antioxidant capacity except at higher cricket flour contents. Cricket flour's high protein content proportionately increased millet flour's, thus pasta products'. Dried pasta products passed all quality norms. Enrichment of millet flour with cricket flour is favourable from both nutritional and quality aspects.

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The primary purpose of these researches was to optimize single-cell protein (SCP) production process using Saccharomyces cerevisiae NCAIM Y.00200 and Kluyveromyces marxianus DSM 4908 strain, and then to analyse the changes in yield of single-cell protein final product using vitamin supplementation. To determine these values, the total sugar content of the fermentation medium, and the protein content of the yeast was determined. During our work, a particular attention was paid to the change of sugar content and yeast protein quantity. Besides, yield (Yx/s) values, typical of the whole fermentation, were also measured. Protein yield, as the final product of fermentation, featured the efficiency of our work. The results of our optimized trial settings that were considered as control, using S. cerevisiae NCAIM Y.00200 and K. marxianus DSM 4908 strains, were compared with the results of vitamin-supplemented fermentation processes. On this basis, we can say that during our trials vitamin supplementation did not influence the final product yield of processes. The counted protein yields during fermentation were between 0.4–0.7 g g−1.

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References A yerza , R. & C oates , W. ( 2011 ): Protein content, oil content and fatty acid profiles as potential criteria to determine the origin of commercially grown

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Acta Alimentaria
Authors: K. Berisha, H. Bytyçi, Zs. Mednyánszky, E. Kiss, and L. Simon-Sarkadi

lactose) content of Busha cattle breeds varied between 13.09–13.86% ( Table 1 ). Protein content of milk was similar (3.7%) for both cattle strains. Higher amounts of fat and lactose were found in Dukagjini cattle milk (4.50; 4.44%) than Sharri cattle milk

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Acta Alimentaria
Authors: M. Aloudat, A. Papp, N. Magyar, L. Simon Sarkadi, and A. Lugasi

, while sugar contents meet the recommendation of less than 10 energy%. Protein content of meals is significantly higher than 15 energy %. Fat content is significantly higher than the upper end of the recommendation, and the energy originated from saturated

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accredited standard methods. The protein content of the products was determined based on the nitrogen content by Kjeldahl method (MSZ 1385:1987). Amount of lactose was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography based on the work of Dunmıre and Otto

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substitution level (P<0.05). It is an expected result, since crude fat content of IRGF (4.85%) was notably higher than refined wheat flour. Although crude protein content of control tarhana was slightly higher (P<0.05) than its counterparts substituted with

Open access