Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 3 of 3 items for

  • Author or Editor: D. L. Nagy x
  • Refine by Access: Content accessible to me x
Clear All Modify Search

Abstract

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder that significantly impacts various aspects of life, including school, work, family, and social relationships. The disorder has a prevalence of 6–7% in children and 4–5% in adults and commonly manifests before the age of 12. Symptoms can be categorised into two groups: attention deficit; and hyperactivity/impulsivity. As individuals age, hyperactivity symptoms generally decrease, while attention deficit symptoms exhibit less change. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder is associated with numerous adverse outcomes, such as comorbid psychiatric disorders, academic difficulties, accidents, injuries, and increased economic burdens on society and individuals. Children and adults with ADHD have a high rate of psychiatric comorbidity, including learning disorders, autism spectrum disorder, anxiety disorders, mood disorders, tic disorders, adolescent substance abuse, and antisocial personality disorder in adulthood. Timely detection, enhanced intervention strategies, and consistent care may alleviate the clinical and economic burden of ADHD.

Open access

Abstract

Purpose

Intensive exercise significantly lowers the pH of muscle and blood; beta-alanine supplementation can increase carnosine levels, the absence of which leads to an early acidosis and fatigue. The aim of our work is to investigate the effect of a single dose of beta-alanine supplementation on well-trained rowing athletes.

Materials/Methods

The spiroergometric parameters of the participants (n = 28) were examined a total of four times (T1,T2,T3,T4). After measurement (T3), participants received a beta-alanine supplementation at a dose of 50 mg/kg−1 body weight. We compared the results of the four measurements as well as the blood lactate values obtained from the fingertip before and after the tests.

Results

The different load physiological parameters and the lactate values measured after the tests did not show any significant difference. The mean lactate value prior to test (T4) was 1.8 (mmol*L−1), which is significantly higher than the mean-value of the two previous studies: T1 = 1.6 (mmol*L−1); (P = 0.00), T3 = 1.55 (mmol*L−1); (P = 0.04).

Conclusions

The higher lactate value measured before test (T4) was probably due to the longer time to return to the baseline values after the series load. In conclusion, a single dose of beta-alanine supplementation has no effect on performance. In order to elicit the ergogenic effect of beta-alanine, the use of short, intermittent diet therapy intervention is not recommended.

Open access
Acta Phytopathologica et Entomologica Hungarica
Authors:
M. Tóth
,
A. Nagy
,
I. Szarukán
,
K. Ary
,
A. Cserenyec
,
B. Fenyődi
,
D. Gombás
,
T. Lajkó
,
L. Merva
,
J. Szabó
,
P. Winkler
, and
J. K. Jósvai

The addition of synthetic (E)-anethol to the known attractant phenylacetaldehyde synergized attraction of the cotton bollworm Helicoverpa armigera, the blend invariably catching 4 to 6 times more than phenylacetaldehyde on its own. Highest catches were recorded by the 1:1-3:1 blends. The addition of salicyl aldehyde, ±linalool, (R)-(+)-limonene, 2-methoxybenzyl alcohol and 4-methoxybenzyl alcohol (compounds described earlier in the literature as co-attractants for H. armigera), increased catches when added to phenylacetaldehyde. However, the addition of these compounds did not increase catches of the (E)-anethol+pheny- lacetaldehyde blend. When directly compared with performance of the synthetic pheromone, the (E)-anethol +phenylacetaldehyde blend caught an average of 27% of the catch in pheromone baited traps. On an average 79% of moths caught in traps with the (E)-anethol+phenylacetaldehyde blend were females, while traps with pheromone caught only males. The (E)-anethol+phenylacetaldehyde blend described in this study may form the basis for the development of an efficient bisexual lure for H. armigera AFTER further optimization.

Open access